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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

jVNDOVEBfUE 



1990 



ANNUAL REPORT 

FOR THE 

TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Prepared by the 
'own Manager 




\rsuant to the PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 
XCTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 
7MMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND ARTICLE ZX 
zCTION FOUR OF THE BYLAWS OF THE 
)WN OF ANDOVER. 



January 1, 1990 Through 
December 31, 1990 




To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover: 



"Government is not a substitute for people, but simply the instrument 
through which they act. In the last analysis, our only freedom is the 
freedom to discipline ourselves." 

Bernard M. Baruch 



I think the quote by Bernard M. Baruch succinctly captures the year 1990 for the Town of Andover. It 
was a year that the Andover voters elected a Republican Governor. It was a year that the people spoke in 
favor of Question 5, to guarantee revenue sharing from the Commonwealth to cities and towns, and spoke 
against Question 3, to severely limit state spending. It was a year that the Selectmen convened four Town 
Meetings. It was a year that Selectmen went through an elaborate process and selected a new Town 
Manager, and a year that Selectmen codified their Polices and Practices. 

Mr. Baruch tells us that government is the instrument through which people act. With this in mind, the 
people spoke at the Town Meeting. In one voice they exercised their freedom to discipline the Town 
government. 

At the Special Town Meeting held on March 12, 1990, the voters reduced the FY-1990 appropriation for 
Town departments by $600,745. They also reduced the appropriation for the operation of Public Schools 
by $570,000. These actions were taken to balance the budget because of reductions in the FY-1990 
resolution aid from the Commonwealth. At that meeting the voters accepted Chapter 653 of the Acts of 
1989, which provides for quarterly real estate tax billing. 

The Annual Town Meeting for 1990 was postponed until June 1 1 , in order to have a better understanding 
of the FY-1 991 resolution aid from the Commonwealth. The Town Meeting voted to appropriate $55,434,994 
for the operation of the Town departments and the Public Schools. The voters also authorized the Board 
of Selectmen to sell water to the Town of North Reading for a period not to exceed twenty years. The Town 
voted to approve the funding for traffic signals at three locations: High Street and Haverhill Street, Lowell 
Street and Haggetts Pond Road, and Frontage Road and Dascomb Road. A Historic District Demolition 
Bylaw, as proposed by the Historical Commission, was overwhelmingly approved. 

At a Special Town Meeting held in November, the voters reduced the FY-1 991 appropriation by $645,000. 
This reduction was brought about because of a shortfall in resolution aid and highway funds from the 
Commonwealth and an increase in the assessments for the county and the health insurance for retired 
teachers. 



In 1990, there are several highlights which must be noted: 

During the summer months, Penguin Park was moved from Iceland Road to the upper Shawsheen play 
field. This was accomplished by a joint venture between the Department of Municipal Maintenance and 
the Department of Public Works with assistance from the Planning Division. This park has proven to be 
very popular with preschoolers and their parents. 

At the Town Yard two new gas tanks were Installed with accompanying fuel pumps, concrete drives, and 
a magnetic card computer system to track the use of fuel by vehicle, department, and driver. 

The Board of Selectmen endorsed the Regional Housing Compact as a commitment to continue the 
affordable housing policies of the Town. 

The Town obtained a conservation easement over the Barron Country Store wetlands, which are tributary 
to Haggetts Pond. The underground tanks were removed in the early summer, thus eliminating a 
tremendous potential liability to the Town's fine water supply. 

For the first time in the Town's history there is now public access to Foster's Pond. Two properties were 
acquired off of Glenwood Road Extension which will provide for eight acres of access to the pond. 

The November elections had one of the highest voter turnouts on record. Eighty-one percent of the 
registered voters participated! 

The Selectmen established Vehicle for Hire Rules and Regulations for Taxicabs, Livery Services, and 
Limos. 

In March, the Drop-In Center opened at the Town House. The response has been overwhelming. 
Staffed by volunteers, it is a very special meeting place for our senior citizens. 

The addition to the Water Treatment Plant on Haggetts Pond was completed and the new ozone facility 
was brought on line. With these new improvements, the Town will exceed all existing and future federal 
and state standards for a municipal water supply system. 

A new recycling program began in August, which includes biweekly curbside collection of newspaper, 
magazines, and glass. Curbside collection has met with approximately 70% participation. An extimated 
1200 tons were collected through December 1990. Andover Recycling, Inc. collects aluminum cans, 
styrofoam, and plastics at the West Middle School on the third Saturday of the month. 

Elden Salter retired as Town Clerk, after over twenty-one years with the Town. Randall Hanson was 
appointed to fill his vacancy. 

In February, Kenneth R. Mahony left his position as Town Manager to enter private business. Anthony 
J. Torrisi served as the Acting Town Manager for four months. I began my term as Town Manager in 
early June. 

In this brief letter I have tried to report on the major highlights of 1990. It would be impossible for me 
to leave this effort without acknowledging the excellent cooperation and support that I have received from 
the Board of Selectmen and other Town boards, committees, and commissions. The Town department 
heads and employees served with great diligence and dedication during the year. It is through their team 
spirit and cooperation that these groups and individuals made 1990 a success. 



The quote by Mr. Baruch in the beginning of this letter indicates that our government is the instrument 
through which the people act. The Town Manager form of governments embodied in the Andover Town 
Charter, is the vehicle that the people chose in 1956 to bring us to action. The Town Charter has served 
the community well for these thirty-four years, and it will continue to be the vehicle for harnessing the 
tremendous talent and energy that exists in this community and disciplining it in the direction of effective 
and efficient local government. 1990 was successful because of the efforts of those who attended Town 
Meetings, who participated in Town government, who called the Town Offices with suggestions or 
complaints, and who voted in our elections. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Board of Selectmen for their generous support and 
encouragement during this year and also the department heads and employees for their teamwork and 
cooperation. It is only through working together that we are able to make Andover a wonderful place to live, 
to raise a family, and to work. 

Please remember to vote at the Annual Town Election on Monday, March 25, 1 991 , and to participate 
in the Annual Town Meeting scheduled for April 1 , 2, and 3, in the Dunn Gymnasium. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 




<*2£22£»:„, 




Dear Citizens of Andover: 



The past year has been extremely challenging for both your elected and appointed officials. For the first 
time since Proposition 2 1/2 had been adopted, Andover is being faced with very serious cuts to all 
Departments, Town and School. 

The Board of Selectmen, along with our new Town Manager, Reginald S. Stapczynski, and the Finance 
and BudgeJ Director, Anthony J. Torrisi, have been working long hours to stretch every single dollar we 
have. We all realize that the economy is such that we must all work together to maximize services with 
limited funds. Every Department Head was asked to do the impossible - maintain all services with less 
money. The Board of Selectmen would like to publicly thank all Town employees for their cooperation in 
these difficult financial times. 

The past year, however, has not been all doom and gloom. In May of 1990, the Board of Selectmen 
unanimously voted to appoint Reginald S. (Buzz) Stapczynski, as our new Town Manager. Buzz has guided 
the Board through these difficult times just as we expected he would. For those citizens that have not yet 
had the pleasure of meeting Buzz, I urge you to do so. I am sure you will find Buzz to be very kind and 
courteous. Buzz is now iiving in Andover with his wife and two children. The Board of Selectmen are 
extremely pleased with the job Buzz has done over the past ten months, and we look forward to working 
with him for many years to come. I would cJso like to give a special thanks to Anthony J. Torrisi, for doing 
a wonderful job as Acting Town Manager. Tony not only acted as Town Manager, but also continued to 
fulfill his responsibilities as the Finance and Budget Director. 



MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR THE YEAR 1990 

Water Facility 

Our new water facility on Lowell Street should be on line in the next couple of months. 

Penguin Park 

The successful moving and rebuilding of Penguin Park. 

Postal Service (Old Town House) 

Completion of negotiations for new postal annex -- opened in February, 1991. 

Appointments to the Zoning Board of Appeals 

Daniel S. Casper was appointed as an associate member in July, due to the resignation of John 
Bryden. 



- Composting Program 

Implementation of a composting program at Bald Hill on High Plain Road. 

- Selectmen's Policy Handbook 

A special thanks to Selectman Gail L Ralston for her work in heading the drive to rewrite the 
Selectmen's Policy Handbook. 

- Removal of Gas Tanks at Barron's Country Store 

The removal of these underground gas tanks was completed last summer to protect Andover's 
drinking water. 

- A ppointment of Personnel Director 

Candace Hall was appointed as Personnel Director on October 15, 1990, to fill the vacancy left by 
Mary Lyman. 

- Classification of Property 

The Board of Selectmen voted to shift the tax rate paid by the commercial/property owners from 15% 
to 20%, due to the revaluation figures. 



Respectfully submitted, 

'James M. Barenboim 
Chairman 
Board of Selectmen 



TOWN CLERK 



During 1990 the Office of the Town Clerk was kept very busy with three elections, two Special Town 
Meetings and the Annual Town Meeting. 

9,686 registered voters voted in the State Primary on September 18th and 14,558 voted in the November 
6th State Election, an 81% turnout. 

At the conclusion of 1990 the population of Andover was 30,196, the registered voters in the Town of 
Andover totalled 17,869 (Republican - 4,013; Democratic - 5,240; and Independent - 8,616) divided among 
eight precincts as follows: 



1 - 1891 


3 - 2236 


5 - 2328 


7-2312 


2-2280 


4-2296 


6 - 2261 


8 - 2270 



The following statistical and financial reports are for the period of January 1, 1990 through December 31, 
1990: 



Males - 140 



Births Recorded: 

Marriages Recorded: 

Deaths Recorded: 

Dog Licenses Sold: 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 



Males - 93 



Females - 125 



Females - 98 



MONIES COLLECTED 



Marriage Licenses 

Certified Copies 

Uniform Commercial Code Filings 

Miscellaneous Licenses Income 

Liquor Licenses Income 

Business Certificate Filings 

Miscellaneous Income (Street Lists, Maps, etc.) 

Dog Licenses 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses 



* $9,608.75 in fees sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Game 
~ $380.40 is retained by the Town of Andover. 



TOTAL 



265 
219 
191 

1609 
748 

$ 2,230.00 
5,127.00 
5,482.00 
1 1 ,555.00 
108,420.00 
966.00 
6,892.00 
6,668.00 
9.989.15* 

$ 157,329.15 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



Calendar 1990 was a year of financial and personnel transition for the town. The declining state 
economy and its impact on state aid and local revenues created a difficult and long process of 
developing a balanced budget. The process began in October, 1989 and continued with the Town 
Manager's recommended budget of January, 1990, a special Town Meeting (FY-1990 budget) in March, 
1990, the Annual Town Meeting of June, 1990 (delayed from the customary April Meeting) and a special 
Town Meeting in November, 1990. The forecast for fiscal year 1992 (released in late 1990 and 
contained in the Town Manager's budget of January, 1991) presents an even bleaker picture of a 
significantly reduced budget. Fiscal Year 1991 operating budget increased 5.3% over the previous year. 
Current projections for fiscal year 1992 have a decrease of 3% from fiscal year 1991. 

During this same period, a major personnel change occurred with the resignation of Mr. Kenneth 
Mahony as town manager effective in early February, 1990. The Board of Selectmen appointed Mr. 
Anthony Torrisi, Director of Finance and Budget as the acting town manager until Mr. Reginald 
Stapczynski was appointed town manager in June, 1990. 

Between January and June more than twenty meetings were held with the Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee and School Committee (individually and jointly) to review and plan for the fiscal year 
1991 town meeting. On May 21, the Finance Committee Report for town meeting was mailed to over 
10,000 households. Town Meeting was held on June 11 and the recommendations were voted by 
Town Meeting. 

Subsequently, state aid was reduced in August and the local economy continued a slow-down. As 
a result a special Town Meeting was held on November 13 to reduce appropriations in the amount of 
$645,000. On October 30 a special Finance Committee report was mailed to all households describing 
the problems and recommendations. Town Meeting approved the reductions as recommended. 

The following table indicates budget transitions from the original fiscal year 1990 budget through 
the current fiscal year 1991 budget. 





FY1 990 BUDGET 
April, 1989 March.1990 


FY1991 BUDGET — 

January, 1990 June, 1990 


November.1990 




ANNUAL TOWN SPECIAL TOWN TOWN MANAGER ANNUAL TOWN 


SPECIAL TOWN 


APPROPRIATIONS 


MEETING 


MEETING* 


RECOMMENDED 


MEETING 


MEETING* 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


3,172.594 


2,961,132 


3.081.641 


3.100,995 


3.100,995 


MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 


3,348,846 


3.233.563 


3.413.673 


3.414,243 


3.268,243 


PUBLIC SAFETY 


5,745,368 


5.708,368 


6,169.233 


6,341,294 


6.341,294 


PUBLIC WORKS 


6,073,412 


5.963.412 


6.272.838 


6,482,560 


6,482,560 


LIBRARY 


1.375,566 


1 .375,566 


1.302.546 


1 .324,981 


1,324,981 


COMP/RESERVE FUNDS 


700.000 


630.000 


250.000 


260.000 


260.000 


EDUCATION 


21.560,049 


21.010,049 


21,362,339 


22.560 J 32 


22,261,132 


FIXED 


11,704,259 


11.636.259 


12.161.189 


11.950.789 


11,750.789 


GRAND TOTAL 


53,700,114 


52,518,369 

FINAL FY1990 
BUDGET* 


54,013.459 


55.434,994 


54,789.994 

CURRENT FY1 991 
BUDGET* 



TAX RATE RECAPITULATION 


ACTUAL 


ACTUAL 


ACTUAL 




FY1989 


FY1990 


FY1991 


* * * AMOUNT TO BE RAISED * * * 








Appropriations 


50,579,729 


52,909,066 


54,852,093 


Other Local Expenditures: 








Tax Title Purposes 


18,450 


15,325 


24,600 


Final Court Judgements 





183,552 





Overlay Deficits 








161,617 


Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 


146,072 


82,981 


73,736 


Revenue/Other Deficits 


202,746 


1,720 





Total Local Expenditures 


367,268 


283.578 


259,953 


State and County Charges 


659,246 


767,498 


901,683 


Overlay Reserve for Abatements 


486,157 


499,566 


713,315 


TOTAL TO BE RAISED 


52,092,400 


54,459,708 


56,727,044 


••EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE*' 








Estimated Receipts from State: 








Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 


6,020,374 


4,986,307 


4,615,768 


Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 


3,146 


3,571 


14,430 


Total from State 


6,023,520 


4,989,878 


4,630,198 


Estimated Local Receipts: 








Local Estimated Receipts 


7,300,000 


8,862,000 


11,454,500 


Offset Receipts 


1,910,909 


2,425,174 


458,684 


Total Local Receipts 


9,210,909 


11,287,174 


11,913,184 


Free Cash and Other Revenue: 








Free Cash - Articles 


1 ,01 1 ,774 


379,697 


62,099 


Other Available Funds 


324,135 


469,021 


395,546 


Revenue Sharing 


13,000 








Total Other Appropriations 


1,348,909 


848,718 


457,645 


Free Cash - Operating Budget 


700,000 


420,000 


670,000 


TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 


17,283,338 


17,545,770 


17,671,027 


TOTAL TAXES LEVIED ON PROPERTY 


34,809,062 


36,913,938 


39,056,017 


TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 


3,225,997 


3,283,609 


3,115,574 


RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 


9.98 


10.40 


11.42 


COMMERCIAL TAX RATE 


12.41 


12.92 


15.04 


INDUSTRIAL TAX RATE 


12.41 


12.92 


15.04 


PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX RATE 


12.41 


12.92 


15.04 


EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


10.79 


11.24 


12.54 


EQUALIZED TAX RATE INCREASE 


9.4% 


4.2% 


11.5% 



The fiscal year 1992 budget, developed in late 1990 and released by the Town Manager in January, 1991 totals 
$53,931,052, a reduction of almost $1 million from fiscal year 1991 and indicates the continuing economic decline in state 
and local economies. 

A number of steps were taken in 1990 to reduce expenditures and /or increase revenues 

. Quarterly property tax billing was voted by town meeting. 
This step allowed the town to spread out its property tax collections over four billing cycles which improved cash flow, 
reduced borrowings, and increased investment income. 

. Town Meeting voted to permit the town to tax in the current fiscal year any new construction and major building 
improvements made between January 1 and June 30. This action allowed the Assessors to include this new growth 
in the town's fiscal 1991 levy limit which helped mitigate further budget reductions and eliminated the one year delay 
that historically occurred between construction and property taxes. 

. The Assessor's Office completed the conversion to the in-house, state computerized assessment system resulting in 
an annual savings of $85,000 in the reduction of two positions and contracted services. 

. The Treasurer/Collector's Office implemented special real estate tax collection efforts in the summer which generated 
payments of more than $1 million in delinquent taxes. 

. The Purchasing Office implemented a new workers compensation payment program with the Massachusetts Interlocal 
Insurance Association (Ml I A) and resulted in a savings of $120,000. 

. The Blue Cross/Blue Shield health insurance deposit was renegotiated with a savings of $50,000. 

. The town issued debt in the late spring and early summer and avoided the dramatic increases in interest rates on tax- 
exempt debt that occurred in the second half of 1990. The $4,610,000 Library refinancing saved the town $200,000 
in interest costs. 

. Both the $4,610,000 Library bond issue and the $3,225,000 general bond issue (Water Treatment Plant, sewers, land 
acquisition, school roof repair and school computers) were rated AA by Moody's Investors Service. This 
accomplishment, given difficult state and local economies, is noteworthy. Only 15% of municipalities nationwide have 
a AA rating. 

. The Data Processing division completed the replacement of computer hardware resulting in better service and lower 
maintenance costs. 

. The Assessor's Office completed the revaluation of all real and personal property for values as of January 1, 1990. 
These values are used to calculate tax bills for FY-1991 (July 1, 1990 - June 30, 1991). The Board of Selectmen, after 
public hearings, voted to set this tax rate at $1 1.42 for residential property and $15.04 for commercial, industrial, and 
personal property. This resulted in a tax classification shift from the residential class to the C.I. P. class, from 115% in 
FY-1990 to 120% for FY-1991. 



CENTRAL PURCHASING 

There were approximately 1650 orders processed for the Town Government and 9000 orders processed for the School 
Department during 1990. Approximately 46 bid openings were held. The continued use of State Bids and contracts has 
proved to be beneficial to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Under the Massachusetts General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase a single item or a wide 
range of goods and services such as: paper products for copy machines, police vehicles, road salt, chemicals, fuel oils, 
vehicle fuels and supplies. 

Some examples of major bids put out by Central Purchasing in 1990: 

- Finance Committee Report - Surface Water Drainage 

- Removal, Replacement & Repair of Roofing - York Street Reconstruction 

& Hashing & associated work at Andover - Misc. Road Materials & Concrete Pipe 

High School - Painting of Road Markings 

- Sidewalks - Office Supplies, Equipment and 

- Sewers Furniture 

- Water Mains - Band Uniforms- School Supplies & 

- Highway Department Equipment Equipment 

- School Lunch (7 items) - Water Meters 

The office of Central Purchasing is responsible for contract compliance regarding Andover's Affirmative Action Plan, and 
insurance coordination and risk management for all Town and School Departments with the exception of health and personal 
insurance which are handled by the Central Personnel Office. 

HIGHLIGHTS 

- From July 2, 1990 to December 1, 1990, there were 718 Purchase Orders processed for the Municipal 
Maintenance side. 

- From July 2, 1990 to December 1, 1990, there were 1696 Purchase Orders processed for the School 
Department. 

- From July 2, 1990 to December 1, 1990, there were 1496 Requests for Payment processed. 

In the calendar year plus the latter part of 1989, there were a number of seminars and lectures attended on 
Massachusetts General Law 30B. Also, monthly meetings on Purchasing, and the Laws of Purchasing were attended. 



VETERANS SERVICES 



The Department of Veterans Services assisted twenty-two families during 1990 with funds to help pay expenses for food, fuel, 
medical, clothing, and personal needs. These expenditures fall under Chapter 1 1 5 of the Massachusetts General Laws and 
are reimbursed 75% to the Town. Eleven veterans were admitted to Veterans Administartion Hospitals for in-house treatment 
at no expense to the Town. 

During the year 1990, forty-two Veterans died, two World War I, thirty-two World War II, four Korean War, and four Vietnam 
War. 



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12 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1990 









BALANCE 








BALANCE 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCIPAL 


JULY I. 1989 


DEPOSITS 


INCOME 


DRAWN 


JUN-30-90 


STABILIZATION 


TOWN 




540,235.93 


60,000.00 


52,378.58 




652.614.51 


RETIREMENT 


TOWN 




495,047.34 




23,958.72 


214,000.00 


305,006.06 


CD. WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




496,312.17 




48.810.17 




545,122.34 


INSURANCE 


TOWN 




290,035 JO 


564.72 


27.6S6.S2 


20.000.00 


298.276.74 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 




113,496.29 


21,000.00 


10,545.91 


37,828.59 


107,213.61 


POST WAR REHABILITATION 


TOWN 




26,426.17 




2,517.91 




28,944.78 


ESTATE S. P. WHTTE 




5,766.63 


7.240.21 




689 83 




7,930.04 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




1.793.53 


3,158.50 


214.30 


2.160.00 


3,008.33 


STATE GRANT MDCR 






2.124.57 




184.50 




2.309.07 


TOWN HALL RESTORATION 






151.95 




14.49 




166.44 


CDAP- ROGERS BROOK 






0.00 








0.00 


CD4P SPECIAL TRUST 




14,300.00 


1.151. 4i 




157.96 




2,009.44 


CDAP TDJ SPECIAL 




200,000.00 


190,805.46 




13,771.13 


96.150.18 


108.426.41 


TOWN INSURANCE 






602,902.34 


2.908.134.91 


36,438.49 


2.850,645.47 


696,830.27 


TOWN INSURANCE (CHECKING) 






0.00 








0.00 


M V. LIBRARY CONSORTIUM 


LIBRARY 




343.93S.42 


313,240.75 


20,614.23 


436,866.00 


242,927.42 


J.GREELEY 


LIBRARY 


5,000.00 


3,000.00 




468.99 


468.99 


3,000.00 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345.R2i.50 


345,825.50 








345,825.50 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


INCOME 




125,035.50 




46,37726 


40.139.89 


131.272.87 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOOD 4 COAL 


5,000.00 


24,374.75 




1,872.81 




26,247.56 


DAVID * LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10,000.00 


26,124.06 




2.446.37 


1,900.00 


26,670.43 


W.L. RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7,845.81 


20,601.15 


74.00 


1.964.94 




22,640.09 


A.J. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5,000.00 


11,936.01 




1.137.26 




13,073.27 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1.302.77 


1,504.50 




143.50 


148.00 


1,500.00 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


758.31 




72.33 




830.64 


SPRING GROVE 






422.999.07 


19,738.00 


38.321.09 


20,768.20 


460,289.96 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




17,709.73 




0.00 


0.00 


17,709.73 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


INTERS ET 




1,948.33 




185.83 


191.66 


1.942.50 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


LOT SALES 




61.029.77 


9,862.00 


5,572.23 




76,464.00 


WEST PARISH 






2.316.93 




230.17 


256.82 


2.29028 


CHRIST CHURCH 






7.632.83 




728.02 


750.85 


7.610.00 


ST. AUGUSTINES 






651.95 




62.18 


64.13 


650.00 


EMILINE LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 




1,003.00 




93.67 


98.67 


1,000.00 


EMMA J. LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 


1.000.00 


546.23 




52.10 


53.73 


544.60 


CONSERVATION FUND 


CONSERVATION 




14,377.39 




1.375.68 




15.753.07 


SUNSET ROCK EXT 


HAMMOND WAY 




13.319.60 




337.94 


7,000.00 


6,857.54 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




24.031.66 




1,421.10 


1,520.00 


23,932.76 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1,000.00 


6,016.46 




373.85 


35.00 


6.555.31 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


INCOME 




12.81 


80.00 


1.8S 


85.00 


9.69 


FARJUNGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


954.92 




91.08 


30.00 


1,016.00 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.83 


812.52 




77.50 


25.00 


865.02 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


195.81 




18.68 


15.00 


199.49 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


6,303.98 




60127 




6,90525 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


4,896 29 




467.01 




5,363.30 


A. * A.V. LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1,000.00 


3289.57 




313.76 




3.603.33 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


591.50 


598.50 








598.50 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






962.93 


80.00 


91.84 


150.00 


984.77 


CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


250.00 


69921 




60.97 




700.18 


AMERICAN LEGION 


UGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


472.08 




45.03 




517.11 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 
1 


50.00 


290.54 




27.71 




31825 


GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDI 


4266,525.65 


3,337,932.8* 


343,419.11 


3,731,351.18 


4216.526.46 



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14 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During the year 1990, eighteen new cases were brought against the Town of Andover. Twelve cases were successfully 
disposed of, leaving a balance of one hundred fifty cases pending litigation. Town counsel made numerous appearances 
before State Courts and Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town Officials. 
Town Counsel rendered in excess of seventy informal opinions and had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town 
Officials on almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meetings. During 
the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and numerous deeds, easements, releases, 
agreements and betterment assessments were drafted, reviewed and recorded. 

JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 



The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund was established by Article 17, of the 1893 Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars, 
($5,000.00) was left to the Town to be used for the needy poor, to purchase wood or coal. Three trustees, chosen on a 
staggered basis, by the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 

Balance on Hand 7/1/89 $24,374.75 

Income 1988/89 1,872.81 

Disbursed - - 



Balance on Hand 7/1/89 $26,247.56 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-term resident of Andover, bequeathed the residue of her 
estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the 
Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income form this fund "be devoted to the assistance of 
the procurement of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need or aid, comfort or 
support on account of old age, disability or unemployment. 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases 
are referred to the Trustees by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-two (22) cases, disbursing $ 32,987.56 on approved cases 
(which numbered twenty-two) and small administration expenses. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal 
of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the direction of the Trustees. All 
disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of 12/31/89 $129,302.68 

Receipts - 1990 39,448.38 



$168,751.06 
Disbursements - 1990 42,987.56 

Balance of Income as of 12/31/90 $135,763.50 



15 



ANDOVER RECYCUNG 




The year 1990 was a year of success for recycling in Andover. After eleven years a non-profit 
corporation organized to provide a recycling program for the Town, it was time to return the 
program to the Town. The economic and environmental benefits of a comprehensive recycling 
program run by the Town were obvious. Fortunately, the trash contract was being re-bid so 
various types of programs and contractors could be explored. 

The year started with the following program in place: paper collected curbskJe every other week 
(approx. 150 ton./month); glass and plastic drop-off at West Middle School every 1st and 3rd 
Saturdays (approx. 9 tons.month). Paper was also being collected from various apartment 
complexes, public and private schools. A styrofoam collection was organized in all the public 
school cafeterias by Joyce Ringleb. 

April 21 st was Earth Day In Andover. The 20th anniversary of Earth Day and recycling in Andover! 
Margaret PusteJI and her committee mobilized many interesting groups to set up displays and 
entertainment in the Old Town Hall. The day was a wonderful celebration for ail ages. 

July, 1990 was the beginning of the fiscal year and the new contract with Waste Management (Vining received the trash 
contract). Green calendars and blue bins were distributed to households during July and Jinny Cole organized the publicity 
effort with the Department of Public Works. Mandatory recycling was endorsed by the Town Manager and the Board of 
Selectmen. The new system began in August: curbskJe collection of paper and glass every other week, the Town being 
divided into two routes, plastic and aluminum cans drop-off once a month only (3rd Saturday) at West Middle School. By 
November, paper and glass tonnage had reached 236 tons/month with a 71% participation rate, and about 3-4 tons/month 
for plastic and cans. 

The Department of Public Works estimates that the Town is recycling 20% of its total trash by weight, and that the recycling 
contract costs 1 0% of the total trash contract plus the Incineration fee. 

We were pleased with the service provided by our contractor, Greg Graham, for the past five years and are delighted with 
the efficient service provided by the new contractor Waste Management. We also appreciate the cooperation we have 
received from Dave White In continuing the collection of plastics and cans. 

Our members continue to provide volunteer assistance to other recycling efforts organized by the Town: - waste motor oil 
drop-off at the North Andover Fire Station; - the October Household Hazardous Waste .Collection at West Elementary School. 

Fran Fink has organized the volunteers for the monthly plastic and cans drop-off. High School students also assisted at this 
collection during the first half of the year. 

Although we have no involvement with the service, we had advocated for a leaf compost site and the collection and chipping 
of Christmas trees. We are delighted that the Town has added these services to their comprehensive recycling program. 

Andover Recycling, Inc. will be dissolved as a legal entity as it is no longer needed as originally conceived. But we shall 
continue to exist as a Committee as long as we can serve the Town. Our objectives will be as follows: to provide volunteers 
for the plastic and can drop-off site; to assist the schools in their efforts to recycle styrofoam and paper, to continue publicity 
about matters related to the recycling services and recycling in general. 

We would like to take this opportunity to congratulate the Town Manager, Buzz Stapczynski, Tony Torrisi, 
Bob McQuade, Dennis Sheehan, Jim Bamford, Everett Penney, and Barbara Gaunt, for their wisdom 
to support recycling in Its many forms and for implementing the numerous services 
listed above. It has been a pleasure to work with you to 
achieve these success. 



a&&3 h 




16 




FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Andover Fire Department provides emergency and non-emergency services necessary to protect life and property in 
the most efficient cost effective manner possible. Its goals are to prevent the loss of life and injury from fire, fire-related 
hazards, accidents and natural disasters; Prevent loss to property from fire or fire-related activities; Prevent loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services; Increase fire safety awareness among area citizens. 
The Fire Department provides these services through the following Divisions: 

The Administration Division is supervised by the Fire Chief who manages the department's daily business operations. He 
coordinates the Department's activities, plans, directs, controls, and evaluates the operating budget; prepares personnel and 
payroll records for 68 employees; coordinates the hiring of new employees; develops management policies; evaluates and 
expands the use of computers in the department; coordinates the secretarial and word processing support to all the 
Divisions. 

The Fire Fighting Division is concerned almost exclusively with the containment and extinguishing of fires within the Town 
of Andover. This effort includes answering service calls which may lead to the early discovery/prevention of fires and 
stabilizing hazardous materials incidents. It also includes formulation and rehearsal of plans concerning how to fight fires 
at various locations. 

The Fire Prevention Division supervised by the Fire Prevention Deputy ensures that conditions favorable to the starting of 
fires do not exist in the Town of Andover. Inspections they conduct and public relations programs especially in the local 
schools, are designed to contribute to this goal. Fire investigations seek to discover the causes of fire and prevent their 
recurrence. A training program provides department personnel with the necessary knowledge to accomplish these goals. 

The Ambulance Division provides emergency medical care for anyone requesting such care in Andover, as well as 
transportation to emergency care facilities. The ambulance also answers fire alarms as medical back-up for both civilian 
victims of fire and fire department personnel. Both residents and non-residents are billed for ambulance services through 
third-party billing. At the present time, 46 members of the Andover Fire Department are nationally registered Emergency 
Medical Technicians. Sixteen of these are assigned to the ambulance. 

The Fire Alarm Division is responsible for the Fire Alarm system which is coded and consists of approximately three and one- 
half million feet of aerial and underground wiring, street alarm boxes, and related signalling equipment. The installation of 
street alarm boxes and related wiring is accomplished by department personnel. Maintenance to all phases of the system 
is also accomplished. 

The Training Division is supervised by the Training Officer is comprised of the four duty Deputy Chiefs who are supplemented 
by Emergency Services personnel acting as Hazardous Material Coordinators, Emergency Medical Coordinators, ET 
Instructors, and Special Training instructors. They are responsible for the yearly training schedule for fire suppression, 
medical emergency, rescue procedures, and hazardous material response team. 

The Arson Division is supervised by the Arson Investigator who responds to all fires that are suspicious in nature. 

The Maintenance Division is supervised by the Apparatus Maintenance Officer who is responsible for a continuous preventive 
maintenance program for 14 vehicles to insure effective and economical operation of equipment. Duties include: Preventive 
maintenance checks for all engine companies and truck companies; test all fire apparatus yearly in accordance with N.F.P.A. 
Standards; certify annually all S.C.B.A. tanks with the use of authorized flow bench, to meet factory specifications; 
certification and testing of relief drivers and fire apparatus operators with the Training Division; provide 24 hour emergency 
on-call service by Vehicle Maintenance for all Fire Department equipment; assist in development of specifications for fire 
apparatus. 

In addition, both the Police and Fire Departments share Central Dispatch. This communications center receives calls for both 
public safety departments and dispatch vehicles and manpower to all emergency calls. 



17 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



Service Calls 

Fire Alarms including both Structures & Vehicles 

Accidental Alarms of Fire 

False Alarms of Fire 

Fire Mutual Aid Calls to Other Communites 

Fire Mutual Aid Calls to Andover 

Ambulance Calls 

Ambulance Mutual Aid to other Communites 

Ambulance Mutual Aid to Andover 

Medical Assist Calls 

Persons Billed for Ambulance Service 

Fuel Oil Heat Installation permits 

Explosive Use Permits 

Building Inspections Conducted 

Fire Drills Conducted 

Flammable Liquid Storage Permits 

Liquified Petroleum Gas Installation Permits 

Cutting/Welding Permits 

Model Rocketry Permits 

Fire Alarm System Permits for New Construction 

Fire Alarm System Permits for Existing Properties 

Fire Alarm System Inspections Conducted 

Miscellaneous Permits Issued 

Fire Alarm Boxes Disconected and Reconnected 



1990 


1989 


5992 


5737 


1424 


1608 


493 


641 


85 


63 


34 


37 


3 


3 


1503 


1459 


158 


126 


218 


164 


264 


230 


1339 


1215 


95 


119 


9 


9 


816 


608 


155 


137 


12 


19 


26 


25 


9 


15 


18 


2 


147 


366 


333 


544 


680 


649 


91 


74 


884 


_ 



18 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The Police Department saw a decrease in most crime totals for the year, although we did see a large increase in 
complaints. Burglaries, larcenies, and motor vehicle accidents were categories that saw decrease, and it seems to be a 
result of the times as all other Merrimack Valley Police Departments experienced the same trends. The latter part of the year 
we have seen an increase in burglaries, larcenies, and armed robberies, hopefully this will not be the trend for the new year. 
The Department did have one resignation in September, and that position was not filled due to budget constraints, thus, the 
total of sworn personnel at the present is 49 positions. 



1986 



1987 



1988 



1989 



1990 



Total Incidents 


22,310 


23,139 


21,561 


25,080 


25408 


Complaints 


6,825 


7^26 


8,485 


9,251 


11,498 


B&E 


208 


185 


162 


278 


180 


Larceny 


541 


519 


581 


691 


611 


Stolen Cars 


120 


116 


127 


162 


169 


Stolen Bicycles 


33 


37 


43 


38 


56 


MV Accidents 


1,072 


1,393 


1,184 


1,216 


1,170 


MV Fatalities 


2 


4 


5 


5 


4 


Vandalism 


335 


353 


469 


368 


327 


Parking Violations 


15,000 


11,875 


13,380 


11,750 


11,674 


MV Citations 


5,046 


3,786 


3,782 


4,746 


4,152 


Mileage 


404,416 


366,910 


324,288 


364,737 


430445 


Gasoline 


48,143 


51,646 


48,166 


51,280 


46,001 



Detective Division 



During 1990, the Andover Police Detective Division investigated three hundred and twenty-six incidents. Two hundred 
and sixty were cleared for a clearance rate of eighty per cent. Overall, burglaries were down in 1990, in Andover as well as 
the surrounding towns. We experienced three armed robberies and one unarmed robbery this year. It seems that the more 
serious crimes are on the rise. Several business breaks occurred int he center of town in the early part of the year. We 
arrested a few local teenagers on this matter. Also the ATM machine in DeMoulas was pulled through in the early morning 
hours. We investigated seventy-five juvenile cases where we interacted with other outside agencies. We processed over 
one hundred and thirty-nine crime scenes for photographs and fingerprints. We also issued in excess of three hundred pistol 
permits and firearms identification cards. 



Civil Defense 



The Director attended State meetings dealing with hazardous materials and compliance with the new SARA TITLE III Law 
that put and awful lot of responsibility on the Town for enforcement of this law. Meetings between Police, Fire, Public Works, 
Public Health, and Conservation have been held throughout the year to accomplish our goals concerning these plans. 

The Auxiliary Police, under the direction of Chief Robert Merrill, started working on a new program dealing with crime 
prevention: that will be in operation in the new year. They also volunteered many hours assisting the Police Department 
during parades, fireworks, races, etc. They give an added touch of security to the citizens by their mere presence. The 
Radio Group was very active throughout the year assisting in many of the same functions and others. 

I, Chief James F. Johnson, certainly am thankful for the professional help donated to the Town by these dedicated 
individuals and am sure I speak for the whole community in thanking them for continuous support for the Town. 



19 



Animal Control Officer's Report for 1990 

Lost Dogs 132 Impounded Cats 32 

Dogs Found 71 Dead Cats Picked Up 34 

Dog Complaints 871 Impounded Dogs 155 

Dead Dogs picked up 5 Various Dead Animals Picked Up . 320 

Money Collected $2,355.65 Number of Citations Issued 41 

Administrative Fees 2,313.65 

Dogs Sold (14) 42.00 Total Number of Calls Answered . . 2,418 

Amount of Gas 1 ,436 gal 

Amount of Mileage 12,899.8 PRO BONO WORK PROGRAM ... hours 

Game Warden 

The Constable Game Wardens of Andover put in about 1400 hours of patrolling during the year 1989. There were a 
number of deer hit by automobiles during the year; some killed and some injured. They were disposed of according to the 
law. If the motorist who hit the deer wanted it, they could take it. Under the new law, the state no longer pick up road-killed 
deer, it is up to the city or town to dispose of them. 

Town land as well as conservation and AVIS land was patrolled especially during the hunting season. Very few violations 
were found this year as most sportsmen are aware of the Town Bylaw regarding the discharge of firearms. 

The state shocked the Shawsheen River with a good amount of trout this year and most fisherman had good luck. 
Trapping was at a minimum this year as wild animal fur prices were unusually low. Racoon were abundant in the area but 
very little interest was shown. The wardens also assisted in removing wild animals from private homes whenever the Animal 
Control officer was not available. 

During the deer season, the local wardens assisted in the monitoring of Harold parker State Forest and passed on any 
violations to the State officers. There is an abundance of deer in the area and a good harvest despite the weather conditions. 
One deer was taken down by dogs and had to be destroyed. 

We wish to thank Chief Johnson for his assistance and the equipment supplied. 

ANIMAL INSPECTION 

The following is a statistical report of the activities of the Inspector of Animals for the calendar year 1990: 

Number of dogs quarantined for biting 27 

Number of Animals tested for Rabies 

Number of Barns inspected 33 

Number of Beef Calves under one year 4 

Number of Beef Cows 10 

Number of Beef Heifers one to two years 25 

Number of Beef Bulls 4 

Number of Beef Steers 60 

Number of Beef Herds (one constitutes a herd) 1 

Number of Donkeys 

Number of Horses (includes work and saddle horses 79 

Number of Ponies 30 

Number of Goats 5 

Number of Sheep 1 

Number of Swine 1 03 

Number of Swine Herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 1 



20 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Department offers year round recreational, enrichment and cultural programs for residents of all ages. The majority 
of the programs are held at the public schools. Recreation Park, Pomps Pond, Central Park the Town House and other 
in-town facilities are also utilized. 

Program booklets were reissued to all residents after a target marketing attempt in the fall. Winter registration was an 
all time revenue producer. Computer, Ballroom Dance and Baseball classes achieved record enrollment. The summer All 
Day camp program flourished setting enrollment and revenue records. The Drop-In playground program continued to be 
popular. The summer preschool programs were held in the Shed Building for the first time, the Year 1990 was the rebirth 
of the teen program. Several successful trips were run to Hampton Beach, Canobie Lake and the Hard Rock Cafe. We look 
forward to continuing these efforts. 

A $10.00 sticker fee was imposed for all residents ($2.00 second car); over $6,000 was collected. A biological study of 
the pond was completed suggesting a chemical or weed solution to eliminate nuisance weeds. Andover residents showed 
increased interest in preserving Pomps Pond. Efforts to organize a community supported ice rink at the Rec Park multi- 
purpose court began. Haunted House and the Mitten Tree continued to draw record participation. 

Community Services is thankful for all the volunteers who rolled up their sleeves. We thank the community for its 
support and look forward to providing quality programs to all residents. 

The following are the particular numbers for FY90: 

Classes 2,890 Open Gym 1 ,380 

I n-Town Events 2,750 Mitten Tree 1,500 

Trips 1 ,200 Summer Playground 750 

Movies & Concerts 2,500 Leagues 620 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Due to the change in health insurance and the cuts made by Elder Services and Mystic Valley, the outreach in the 
department has greatly increased. Seminars have been scheduled in the month of march to explain the Medicare changes 
that will be taking place. Fortunately our Outreach Coordinator is very well versed on these changes and is capable of 
offering a great deal of help to our Seniors. 

The Meals-on-Wheels is well accepted. However, there are some seniors that could benefit from this service that aren't 
taking advantage of it. We are trying very hard to make the senior population knowledgeable about what we have to offer. 
There are so many people out there that we are trying to reach and if they only know how much we want to help, they would 
contact us. 

A Grant in the amount of $7,279.00 from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Executive Office of Elder Affairs, was 
awarded to the Andover Council on Aging on October 11, 1990, for the purpose of much needed furniture replacement 
throughout the Senior Center. 

Health education programs, eye screenings, cholesterol screenings and blood pressure clinics, continue to be very well 
attended. 

The Volunteer program continues to be successful. Crafts and bake sales and a Flea Market has recently raised 
$2,000.00 for the Senior Center. This economy makes it difficult to count on past monies raised through special events. 
But, we're trying, and individual donations do happen when we least expect them. Andover Home for Aged People has been 
very supportive for us, which is greatly appreciated. The Drop-In Center is something we're very proud of and we thank 
former Town Manager Kenneth Mahony for this. He trusted us enough to make this a success and he certainly was right 

21 



in his decision. I'm happy to report that this is a very well received endeavor, 
contributing by providing refreshments to accompany coffee we provide. 



Some of the merchants in Andover are 



The Fifth Annual "Senior Prom" which was held at the Andover Marriott on May 23, 1990, was the most successful to this 
date, with an attendance of more than 125 people. Thanks to a donation of $1 ,500.00 from Andover Home for Aged People, 
we were able to make this a very special event. The "Prom" is the biggest event of the year for the Seniors and they look 
forward to it with great anticipation. 

It's very important that all of us have something to strive for and anticipate. The Firefighters Christmas Parade and the 
Festival of Trees at the Old Town Hall provided us with anticipation as well as realization. I hope we can continue to give 
our Senior Citizens something to look forward to and let them know how much they mean to us. 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



The Annual Report of the Greater Lawrence Technical School is prepared each year in conformity with the terms of the 
Agreement to Establish a Regional Vocational School District. Participating communities in the Region are the City of 
Lawrence and the Towns of Andover and, North Andover and Methuen. The content of the Annual Report under the terms 
of the Agreement is to contain a detailed financial statement for the prior year and a budget for the current year. Further, 
it is required that for each budget period there be included a statement showing the method by which the annual charges 
assessed to each member community were computed. Lastly, along with statistical and financial data, the Regional School 
Committee may add such additional information relating to the operation and maintenance of the school deemed necessary 
or appropriate. 

FACILITY USE 

Following a policy adopted when the school was initially built, the school has been made available to organizations within 
the region who desire to use many of the school's varied facilities. During the school year, 1989-90, over 70 organizations 
used the facilities. 

COURSES AVAILABLE FOR REGULAR DAY STUDENTS (1989-90) 

Allied Health Tech. Electronics 

Auto Body Food Tech/Management 

Automotive Graphic Communications 

Carpentry Heavy Equipment 

Clothing Arts & Design 

Construction & Building 



Cosmetology 
Culinary Arts 
Data Processing 
Distributive Education 
Drafting 
Electrical 



Industrial Electronics 
Machine Technology 



Major Appliance/Air Conditioning/Refrig. 

Metal Fabrication 

Painting & Decorating 

Plumbing & Pipefitting 

Small Engine Repair 

Upholstery 



PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES - SCHOOL YEAR 1989-90 





STUDENTS 




PERCENT OF 


NEW CO-OP 




EMPLOYED 




SENIOR CLASS 


AGREEMENTS 


September 




146 


51% 


18 


October 




172 


61% 


7 


November 




191 


69% 


6 


December 




200 


73% 


5 


January 




208 


75% 


1 


February 




213 


78% 


1 


March 




215 


78% 


3 


June 




239 


92% 


18 



As of graduation day in May, 1990, over 92% of the senior class had received employment. The business firms with 
Cooperative Work Agreements with the school numbered 1 764, an increase of 59 companies within one year. 



22 



PtOPOSID BUDGET 
• PT 1990 - 

(1ITIIID) 



JAIUUT 24, 1919 



1000 



cEimi 





IXPKISI Of IIST1DCTI0I 




2000 


DAT SCHOOL 


$5,217,596.00 




SPECIAL EDUCATIOI 


$306,404.00 


3000 


AUIILIA1T AGEICIIS 




3350 


COST OP TIAISP0ITATI0I 




4100 


OPItATIOI OP PLAIT 




4200 


IAIITEIAICI OP PLAIT 




5000 


SPICIAL CHUMS 




6000 


IISCELLAIEOUS 




7000 


OUTLAY 




1000 


DEBT 1STIEEIEIT 





Pcndi for ledoction 

PUPIL T1AIS CI 71, 1 16C 

SCHOOL PIOC TlilS CI 71,71A,71I,7 74 

SCHOOL BLDG ASSIST CI 645, 511 

1BCI0IAL SCHOOL AID CI 71, 16D 
TUITIOI STATI IA1DS CI76, SS7, 9, CI 74 
SCHOOL AID CH 70 
OTHEl PODS 



IET TOTAL 



$466,467.00 
5,524,000.00 



429,912.00 
571,093.00 
113,371.00 
525,620.00 
120,172.00 
481,122.00 
294,098.00 
170,000.00 

$10,103,555.00 



575,946.00 

3,670.00 

214,988.00 

1,888,437.00 

17,181.00 

3,899,246.00 

100,000.00 

$6,699,468.00 

$3,404,087.00 



AIDOTIt 
LAnilCI 

IBTHUEI 
10. AIDOTEI 



IATIO 

STUDEIT 

POPULATIOI 


AUSOST 1 


BUDGET SHU! POl IACI IDIICIPALITT 


TOTAL PATIEIT 


* CHAIGE 
OTSK FT89 


DECEI1E1 1 AP1IL 1 


JUII 1 


0.026 
0.725 
0.207 
0.042 


22,126.50 
616,990.75 
176,161.50 

35,743.00 


22,126.50 22,126.50 
616,990.75 616,990.75 
176,161.50 176,161.50 

35,743.00 35,743.00 


22,126.50 
616,990.75 
176,161.50 

35,743.00 


88,506.00 

2,467,963.00 

704,646.00 

142,972.00 


(26.1) 

24.0 

2.6 

13.8 


1.000 


$851,021.75 


$851,021.75 $851,021.75 


$851,021.75 


$3,404,087.00 


16.5 



PT90 - I.I.O.C. ESTIMATED EETEIOES: $553,813.00 
(MUST BE USED POI 1DDITI0IAL IISTIUCTIOIAL EXPEIDITU1BS; 
CAI IOT BE DSED AS 'PDIDS POl IEDUCTIOI.'} 



23 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 

FUND ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1990 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



BOOK VALUE MARKET VALUE 



CASH 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



30,941.85 $ 



30,941.85 



SECURITIES 
STOCK 



100 


SHARES ALZACORP 


300 


SHARES BAXTER INTL. INC. 


200 


SHARES COMMUNITY PSYCH CENTERS 


1,000 


SHARES DUFF & PHELPS SEL UTILITIES 


600 


SHARES HEALTHCARE COMPARE 


300 


SHARES HEALTHSOUTH REHAB. CORP. 


300 


SHARES SERVICEMASTER LTD. PRT. 


700 


SHARES TERADYNE, INC. 


200 


SHARES XEROX CORP. 




TOTAL STOCK 


OTHER 





$15,000 
$35,000 
$19,646 



U S TREASURY NOTE, DUE 2/15/98 
U S TREASURY NOTE, DUE 8/15/98 
GSIFGGNMA SERIES 



TOTAL OTHER 



TOTAL SECURITIES 



RESERVE - LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



4.437.50 
6,712.50 
4.925.00 

10,000.00 
3.975.00 
4.762.50 
6,900.00 
6,650.00 

10,875.00 



34,312.40 $ 

93,549.90 $ 

0.00 

124.491.75 $ 



5.087.50 
8,362.50 
5,825.00 
8,625.00 
10,350.00 
7,500.00 
7.087.50 
4.900.00 
7,100.00 



59.237.50 $ 


64.837.50 


14,680.58 $ 


15,088.95 


14,196.35 


18,900.00 


5,435.47 


5.127.60 



39,116.55 
103,954.05 



134,895.90 



RESERVE FUND 

RESERVE CASH 

ANDOVER SAVINGS BANK PRIME ACCOUNT (749-700150) 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT 

BAYBANK/MIDDLESEX 



TOTAL ALL FUNDS 



4,092.37 
5,555.62 



9,647.99 



2,478.34 



136,618.08 



24 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 . 1990 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



BALANCE 
1/1/90 



CURRENT 

YEAR 

NET INCOME 



SUB 
TOTAL 



LESS 

AWARDS 



45,509.45 



BALANCE 
12/31/90 



H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 


3,242.61 


112.15 


3,354.76 


0.00 


3.354.76 


J.W.BARNARD 


6.550.43 


226.56 


6,776.99 


0.00 


6.776.99 


ALICE M.BELL 


1,027.30 


35.53 


1.062.83 


45.00 


1.017.83 


EDNA G.CHAPIN 


2,358.69 


81.58 


2,440.27 


100.00 


2.340.27 


FRED W.DOYLE 


13,664.45 


472.61 


14,137.06 


1.000.00 


13.137.06 


WARREN F.DRAPER 


1,538.69 


53.22 


1.591.91 


65.00 


1,526.91 


WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 


1,668.12 


57.69 


1.725.81 


0.00 


1,725.81 


ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


1,027.29 


35.53 


1 ,062.82 


45.00 


1.017.82 


MYRON E.GUTTERSON 


1 ,029.33 


35.60 


1,064.93 


45.00 


1.019.93 


ANDOVER GRANGE 


2,731.73 


94.48 


2.826.21 


200.00 


2,626.21 


PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 


10,670.81 


937.75 


11,608.56 


1.000.00 


10,608.56 


RESERVE-COST OR MKT. 


0.00 


(2,293.75) 


(2.293.75) 




(2.293.75) 



(151.05) 45,358.40 2,500.00 42,858.40 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 

INTEREST INCOME 

DIVIDEND INCOME 

LOSS ON SALE OF SECURITIES 

BROKERAGE FEES 

INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEES 

ADJ.TO LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 

NET LOSS 



2,232.82 

714.76 

(175.00) 

(285.88) 

(344.00) 

(2,293.75) 



($151.05) 



FUNDS HELD 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

100 SHARES BRISTOL MYERS 

100 SHARES DUN & BRADSTREET CORP. 

350 SHARES ROLLINS ENVIRONMENTAL SVCS. 

100 SHARES XEROX CORP. 

(1) CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT- AN DOVER BANK 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 



MARKET 


BOOK 


VALUE 


VALUE 


$13,909.59 


$13,909.59 


6.700.00 


5,350.00 


4.212.50 


4,262.50 


3.106.25 


4,812.50 


3.550.00 


5,437.50 


11,380.06 


11,380.06 




(2,293.75) 


$42,858.40 


$42,858.40 



25 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANOOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1990 

SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



1/1/90 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



COMSTOCK FUND 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 



RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 
COST OR MARKET 



32.670 86 -LOSS ON SALE OF SECURITIES 

16.605.72 -BROKERAGE FEES/TAX 

88.842 74 -INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEE 

-10% OF ANNUAL INCOME(1/1-12/31/90) 
-TRANSFER FROM RESERVE FUND - 6/90 
-OTHER TRANSFERS FROM RESERVE FUND 
0.00 -ADJUSTMENT TO COST/MARKET RESERVE 



12/31/90 

(13.127.11) PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 30.941.85 
(1.685 88) SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 93.549.90 
(1.391.00) 
768.00 
710.00 
1 .098.42 RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 

0.00 COST OR MARKET 0.00 



138.119.32 DECREASE 



(13.627.57) 



124.491.75 



CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS 
CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 
MERRILL LYNCH MGT.ACCT. 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 

(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 
3.845.1 1 CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS 

1,715.07 DIVIDENDS RECEIVED 3.784.00 CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 

7.832.70 INTEREST RECEIVED 3.899.90 PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



13.392 88 



INCOME TOTAL 



7.683.90 



4.092.37 
2.478.34 
5.555.62 

12,126.33 



EXPENSES 



ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL PROJECTS 

WISC OPERATING EXPENSES 

EXPENSE TOTAL 

NET GAIN 
TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 
-10% OF INCOME (1/1-12/31/90) 
-UNEXPENDED SCHOOL PROJECT FUNDS 
-OTHER TRANSFERS 

DECREASE 



5.984.58 
389.45 

6,374.03 

1.309.87 

768.00 

710.00 (7/1/89-6/30/90) 
1.098.42 



(1.266.55) 



151.512.20 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



136.618.08 



26 



ANDOVER HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

The inauguration of an annual preservation award program and the initiation of an historic building marker program 
featured the Commission's 1990 activities. The adoption by the June Town Meeting of a demolition delay ordinance 
proposed by the commission was another significant development in our efforts to encourage preservation. 

Considerable involvement by commission members on the Central Business District Task Force was undertaken to assure 
"reasonable conformity of building design" to avoid deterioration of the character of the downtown area. Future 
representation by a member of the Historical Commission the Design Advisory Group and other steps will hopefully assure 
that historic significance and reasonable conformity thereto will be considered as changes occur. A survey of Andover's 
central business district properties was completed by member Karen Herman with assistance from Barbara Thibault and Jim 
Batchelder of the Andover Historical Society. Member, Thomas O'Leary prepared corresponding computerized maps of 
these downtown buildings indicating the historic significance of each structure. 

Member, Bernice Haggerty resigned after giving many years of service based on her keen knowledge of Andover history. 
We will also miss the highly professional input of Architect, John Dugger, and essex County Planner, Thomas O'Leary. 
Attorney Ellen Zipeto, and former Selectmen, Norma Gammon, are worthy replacements. 

Other activities during 1990 include efforts to support the preservation of the Abbot-Baker House at 5 Argilla Road and 
the adjacent Benjamin Abbot House at 89 Andover Street. 

The preservation of the West Parish and South parish church steeples also drew our support and encouragement. Other 
efforts were made to encourage a post office facility in the Old Town Hall. The Commission is also in the process of 
recommending the addition of the former Post Office Building at 91 Main street to the National Register of Historic Places. 

The Preservation Award and Building Marker Programs are managed jointly with the preservation committee of the 
Andover Historical Society. The latter's Educational Director, Barbara Thibault, plays a key role in both programs. Jim 
Batchelder designed the new historic marker. Memorial Hall Library has helped to promote both programs. Society staff 
and volunteers help property owners to research the required documentation to verify the historic significance of each 
building. Preservation awards are given to outstanding examples of preservation within the Andover community. 

Three of Andover's first period houses, those built prior to 1725, were added this year to the National Register of Historic 
Places. 

The demolition delay ordinance provides up to six months delay on a limited number of structures most of which are 
in or near one of the Town's seven historic districts, we are currently working to identify individuals or groups who could 
provide alternatives to building demolition including those structures not covered by the new ordinance. 

Our objectives for 1991 are as follows: 

- Promote heritage education in the community. 

- Establish local historic districts. 

- Continue to update the inventory of historic properties. 

- Continue working relationships with other town commissions and departments. 

- Seek funding resources for historic rehabilitation. 

- Continue historic marker program. 

- Continue preservation awards within the community. 

- Continue to encourage a cooperative exchange of ideas and resources among various 
community groups and individuals interested in the continued preservation of Andover's historic 
properties. 



27 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

The Department of Municipal Maintenance provides sen/ices to all departments requesting repair or new work to their 
facilities, grounds, or vehicles. We also provide services to the general public for street lighting, traffic lights, rubbish pickup, 
park and parking lot lighting, athletic fields, fencing, leaf composting, tree work, and custodial services for events. We are 
charged with keeping Andover facilities, vehicles and grounds in good condition and to improve the facilities through an 
ongoing capital program. We provide a cemetery, and increases areas for burials are cleared and constructed by our own 
labor at a minimal cost. 

The department is required to keep abreast of required Federal, State and Town laws and regulations concerning health 
safety, pesticide application, underground fuel tanks, radon, air quality, asbestos, lead paint and hazardous waste disposal. 

The Director of the Municipal Maintenance Department has direct supervision of the three Superintendents, Administrative 
Secretary, Account Clerk, and two part-time Receptionist/Switchboard Operators. 

Building Maintenance Division 

The following are some of the highlights which the Building Maintenance Division completed during the year: 

1. Bancroft School - major roof repairs were made; new rugs were installed in the upper lofts (which have long been 
needed); and the gym floor was repaired, sanded, restriped and refinished. The exterior stairwell leading to the second 
floor in the rear of the building was rebuilt. 

2. Sanborn School - the library was relocated. In the new area new rugs and new shelving were installed. The rooms were 
repainted as were the cafeteria and gymnasium. 

3. Andover High School - the entire building has been reroofed with the final section completed this year. The gymnasium 
floor was sanded, restriped and refinished. Some new lockers were installed and more vertical blinds were installed in 
the classrooms. Various corridors, stairwells and classrooms were repainted. 

4. Doherty School - the girls' locker room showers were remodeled. New toilet partitions were installed in the boys' and 
girls' restrooms adjacent to the library and the cafeteria. Fourteen doors plus frames and hardware were replaced. 

5. West Elementary School - new partitions were installed in the restrooms and plumbing fixtures were changed in the old 
wing of the school. Various rooms and corridors were repainted. 

6. Shawsheen School - damaged doors and toilet compartments were replaced; some of the exterior walls were resiliconed, 
various rooms and corridors were repainted and exterior windows were refinished in sections of the building. 

7. South School - ceilings were completed in the corridors and a new floor and ceiling were installed in the walkway to the 
kindergarten classroom; all restrooms were repainted. 

8. New rugs were installed in the conference rooms in the Town Offices building, and the Assessor's Office and Treasurer's 
Office were enlarged. Structural reinforcement to the roof and to the third-floor conference room was completed. 
Various rooms and corridors were repainted. 

9. The relocation of Penguin Park was a major project for the Building Maintenance personnel, but it took most all of the 
town's departments at various times to assist in the completion of this project. It is a joy to see the great use this facility 
is experiencing from the townspeople. 

10. The old fuel tanks were removed at the town yard and new tanks were installed with computerized pumps which service 
and fuel all the town's vehicles. 



28 



Unless an emergency situation arises, the daily operational needs of the schools and town buildings are served on a priority 
basis by the Building Maintenance personnel who play a vital part in the maintenance of all the town-owned structures. 

Parks and Grounds Division 

The three parks and Grounds divisions )Parks & Grounds, Cemetery, and Forestry) are independent and interdependent. 
They all operate under the supervision of one superintendent. They share certain pieces of equipment and work together 
on special projects. A with any public agency with manpower, special equipment, and vehicles in its inventory, the three 
divisions perform many tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties such as delivering surplus 
government food to the Senior Center, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole maintenance, fence/gate/backstop 
repairs, drainage corrections, ice control, snow removal, and moving extraordinarily heavy objects like the whiskey barrels 
used as planters in the downtown area. 

Parks 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields and 1.4 million square feet of lawn areas. Ballfields are 
located on all school grounds and other areas such as Recreation Park, Ballardvale Playground, Upper Shawsheen, Lower 
Shawsheen, the Bowling Green, and the Deyermond Field. Lawn areas are the grounds of all Town and School buildings, 
parks, playgrounds, and designated islands, triangles, and other parcels throughout town. Ballfields are prepared (groomed 
and lined) for all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watery, overseeding, 
liming, fertilizing, and controlling weeds, and insects. Pesticide operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel 
using approved pesticides and methods. This division also maintains small tress, shrubs, and shrub beds on Town property, 
and cuts back brush encroaching upon ballfields and recreation areas. 

Cemetery 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town of Andover. The cemetery contains 
approximately sixty acres and is approximately 70% developed. During 1990, there were 84 burials and 58 sales of lots. 
Out of a total of $48,270 collected, $22,672 was turned over to the Town Treasurer, and $25,598 was added to the principal 
of the Perpetual Care Fund. Cemetery operations and maintenance consists of burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning 
of shrubs and small trees, leaf pickup, snow removal, care of its own facilities and equipment, and out-of-cemetery tasks such 
as trash in Recreation Park, drainage work, and construction. In 1990, work was begun to develop 1.4 acres for future 
burials. 

Forestry 

Forestry is responsible for maintenance for trees along the roadside, on school property, and other Town-owned land. 
During 1990, 116 dead and dying large trees were removed. Additionally, the division removed approximately 200 trees in 
a wooded 1.4 acre parcel at Spring Grove Cemetery, and approximately thirty trees at West Fire Station, to clear land for 
a leaching field. In 1990, forestry planted 120 full size shade trees along the roadside and in a small nursery at the cemetery; 
additionally, 300 seedlings were planted in the nursery area. Tree varieties planted in 1990 were: Bradford Pear, Green Ash, 
Armstrong maple, White Pine, Kentucky Coffeetree, and Tuliptree. Approximately 25% of the personnel's time was spent 
on pruning which consists of street-by-street pruning, problem tree pruning, storm repairs, flatclearing areas of undesirable 
vegetation, and removing obstructions at intersections and curves thus providing better visibility. Spray operations were 
conducted to control poison ivy and other undesirable vegetation along the roadside; and, with a farm tractor, the division 
mowed tall weeds along the roadside throughout the Town. 



29 



Plumbing, Heating & Electrical Division 

This division is responsible for maintenance and operation for all electrical, plumbing and heating systems of all Town 
buildings and property. Some area where updating and improvements are: 

Bancroft School - Removal of fuel oil tank and installation of a new gas heating burner. 

West Elementary School - Removal of fuel oil tank and installation of a new gas heating burner. Installation of steam line 
connecting the new boiler room to the old boiler room. This will allow the shutdown of two boilers in the old section allowing 
for considerable fuel savings. 

Sanborn School - Removal of fuel oil tank and installation of new gas burner. 

West Middle School - Complete overhaul of condensate-return pump system. 

Doherty School - Installation of new energy-saving light switching devices. 

With the advent of increasing budget restraints, it will become even more vital to maintain this equipment in an 
operational and efficient condition. 

Vehicle Maintenance Division 

This division is responsible for the repairs and upkeep of all Town Vehicles including large mowers, air compressors, 
sewerage equipment, etc. With the loss of one mechanic from the workforce, we are doing our utmost to keep the down 
time of all equipment at a minimum. 

With pending future budget restraints, we are making every endeavor to increase the longevity of all Town Equipment 
such as complete paint restoration of some badly needed Highway Trucks. 

We purchased one (1 ) new V-spreader this year to keep within the required level of available equipment for salt and sand 
spreading. 

PUBLIC WORKS 



Engineering 

Field surveys, construction plans and documents, competitive bids, field layouts and construction supervision were 
provided for the following projects: 

- Completion of surface water drainage contract from 1989, Greenwood Road, River Street and Andover Street. 

- Installation of water main, Glenwood Road extension. 

- Sewer construction in North Street to Webster Street completed. 

- Gasoline tank removal at Barron's Country Store. 

- Replacement of water main in High Plain Road from Serenity Lane to Beacon Street and in Beacon Street from High 
Plain Road to the West Elementary School. 

- Pavement recycling and paving of Greenwood Road between High Plain Road and Lowell Street. 

30 



- Bidding., layout and supervision of traffic light installation and intersection improvements at Lowell Street and Haggetts 
Pond Road. 

• Fence and guard rail Lowell Street near the Water Treatment Plant. 

- Clark Road curb and sidewalk replacement, 800 feet more or less at the Oascomb Road end. 
A great deal of time 

• Bids were received for the installation of traffic lights on Dascomb Road at Frontage Road. 
Construction to take place in the spring. 

A great deal of time was spent this year on the following Town of Andover projects: 

- York Street improvements under a CDAG grant. 

• Rehabilitation plans for the Central Street and Stevens Street bridges over the Shawsheen River by consultants. 

- River Road improvements, Route 93 to the Lawrence line. 

- Harding Street railroad bridge by the MDPW. 

For the Planning Board, preliminary and/or definitive plans for 12 subdivisions of land with a total of 255 lots were reviewed 
to determine conformance with its rules and regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. The 
necessary performance bond amounts were figured where needed and filed inspections of subdivisions under construction 
were carried out. Legal description for roadway layouts and easements were checked before they were filed in the Registry 
of Deeds. 

Survey, easement and betterment plans were prepared where necessary for the projects outlined above and for other 
proposed projects. Federal and State government agencies were consulted on engineering matters, principally concerning 
Chapter 90 construction, sewer main extensions and State Highway projects. 

Many Town residents and others were assisted in obtaining information about existing utilities, street layouts, industrial and 
residential sites and other general information. The engineering records of the Town were maintained and updated and other 
Town Departments were aided in obtaining information. The Engineering Division updates the Town Assessor's maps and 
prints the necessary copies for the Town Departments. Street Opening permits for the installation and repair of underground 
utilities were issued through this division and the inspections were carried out. 

The Engineering Division of Public Works consists of four employees. 

Highway 

During 1990, six streets were resurfaced with a bituminous concrete for a total of 2.2 miles 

During the spring and summer, two sweepers are kept busy in continuous cleaning of all streets after winter sanding. Both 
sweepers start each morning at 5:00 a.m. The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division in its inspection of the 
conditions of new street before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway Division also provides men and equipment 
for all other divisions when needed. 

1,288 catchbasins and 7 storm drains were cleaned and kept free of all debris, and all Town brooks were also cleaned and 
maintained. Some 48 catchbasins and 2 storm drain were repaired because of deterioration and damage caused by frost 
and icy conditions during the winter season. The Highway Division, with the help and cooperation of all other divisions of 
the Public Works Department and the Department of Municipal Maintenance, is also responsible for snow removal and ice 
control, including flood control for all Town roads. 

31 






Solid Waste 

The Town, under contract, collected 11,233 tons of residential refuse. Andover, being a member of the North East Solid 
Waste Committee (NESWC), has its refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-energy Plant in North 
Andover, where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. In August the Town implemented a mandatory curbside 
recycling program for newspapers/magazines and glass, which has recycled 1,191 tons of material. 

Water 

The Water Division consists of 17 full-time employees and is responsible for the meter reading, supply, treatment and 
distribution of drinking water to the community. The major components of the water system are as follows: Supply - 
Haggetts Pond, Fish Brook, Merrimack River, Abbot Well; Treatment - Water Treatment Plant; Chlorination Facilities - Fish 
Brook; Pumping Stations - Water Treatment Plant, Fish Brook, Bancroft Reservoir, Prospect Hill and Wood Hill. The Water 
Treatment Plant has recently undergone an expansion to increase capacity from 12 MGD to 24 MGD and has added an 
Ozone Treatment facility which came on line in January. 

Distribution Mains - 182 miles and 8,853 connections. 

The total water pumped to the system from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1990, was 1,782,479,000 gallons. The 
average daily pumping was 4,883,504 gallons, with a 
maximum day of 10,923,000 gallons occurring on July 19, 1990. 

Hydrants Repaired 53 

Hydrants Replaced 9 

Water Main Breaks Repaired 15 

House Service Leaks Repaired 8 

House Services Renewed 9 

Water Main Taps 7 

New Water Meters Installed 89 

Old Water Meters Replaced 254 

Water Meters Repaired 9 

Sewer 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater pumping stations on Dale Street in 
Ballardvale, Bridle Path Road, West Elementary School, Shawsheen Village, and the entire system of sanitary sewers. 

The sewerage system includes 66 miles of sanitary sewers and 4,634 connections. In the past year, the division freed 29 
blockages in sewer mains, rodded 23 mains, repaired 1 , and answered 27 private sewer problems. The Shawsheen Village 
Pumping Station discharges by means of a force main through the City of Lawrence to the Merrimack River. The raw 
sewage discharge from Shawsheen Village Pumping Station Pumping Station is collected and treated by the Greater 
Lawrence Sanitary District's Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment Facility continued to provide service to residential, commercial 
and industrial users in 1990. Since its initial operation in April 1977, the facility has treated 100 billion gallons of wastewater 
that was being discharged, untreated, into the Merrimack River. 

In 1990, Andover's share of the flow at the plant was 3.645 million gallons per day. 

The plant is currently staffed by 73 people. The operation is continuous 24 hours per day and 365 days per year. The 

District Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 

32 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 



Planning Division 



The Planning Division is responsible for a wide range of activities involving residential, industrial, and commercial development in 
Andover through administration of the Town's land use regulations and controls. The division is responsible for processing the plans 
for nearly all new development in the Town. The division provides professional technical support to the Planning Board and the 
Zoning Board of Appeals as well as the Fair Housing Committee and the Housing Partnership Committee. The Planning Division 
also represents the Town on the Regional Housing Committee. In addition to these ongoing duties, this year the division provided 
professional staff support to a subcommittee of the Planning Board created to specifically address planning issues raised about 
the Central Andover area. Division staff assisted the subcommittee in developing detailed recommendations on specific planning 
issues. Division staff also administer a Community Development Action Grant totaling $765,000 which was awarded to the Town 
for specific public improvements in the Shawsheen Village area. The Planning Board consists of five volunteer members appointed 
by the Town Manager, and confirmed by the Selectmen, to five-year terms. 

During 1990 the Planning Board held twenty-three meetings. Seven Definitive Subdivision Plans were submitted with filing fees 
totalling $8,950.00; six plans were granted approval and one plan was withdrawn without prejudice, creating a total of sixty-six new 
residential lots. Six requests for modification to restrictions of previously approved Definitive Subdivision Plans were submitted; 
all were approved. Three Preliminary Plans were submitted; the Board approved all three. Thirty-seven subdivision plans not 
requiring formal Planning Board approval involving $1,050.00 in filing fees were certified involving nineteen new lots. Seven 
subdivision performance guarantees totaling $287,045.00 were secured from developers. Nine site plan reviews, 4 of which were 
Special Permits, were conducted by the Planning Board. The Planning Board reported on forty-nine Warrant Articles for the 1990 
Annual Town Meeting. The year 1990 also saw the finalization of five years of effort through the Planning Division toward a regional 
housing strategy and plan. This effort culminated in the endorsement by the Board of Selectmen of a Regional Housing Compact 
with the neighboring communities of Lawrence, Methuen, and North Andover. 

The Planning Board processed 26 proposals for street acceptance for the 1990 Town Meeting, 1 1 of which were accepted as public 
ways. 

Building Division 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of the State 

Building Code 780 CMR of the Acts of I972 and Zoning Act, Massachusetts General Laws 40A. The Building Division issues permits 
for all types of construction including, but not limited to, school buildings (both public and private), institutional buildings (nursing 
homes), business, commercial and industrial buildings, dormitories, multi-family as well as single family dwelling, pools, chimneys, 
signs and additions and alterations to all structures. The Building officials also perform periodic inspections for those buildings 
which are required to obtain Certificates of Inspection under State Building Code, Table I08. 



Type 

Single Family Dwellings 
(including foundations) 
Additions and Alterations to 
All Types of Buildings 
New Industrial! 
Pools, Signs, Chimneys, Raze 
Public Buildings/Schools 
Certificates of Inspection 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Total 



Number 



73 

482 
1 

313 
26 
24 



Estimated 




Values 


Fees 


$11,433,500 


$85,405 


17,525,278 


119,868 


13,000 


92 


497,699 


7,002 


10,830,150 


59,839 




1,172 




2.804 


$40,299,627 


$276,18: 



33 



Building officials are employed to administer the building code and the zoning bylaws which are adopted by both state and local 
governments. The scope of these codes encompasses a broad range of professional and trade subject area; among them, 
architecture, engineering, fire safety, 

law, electrical, carpentry, plumbing and gas. Building officials must be familiar with and informed to provide the public with 
information and guidance on all building and code related matters. 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTIONS 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding of persons and property from hazards arising from 
the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is responsible for receiving 

and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis, inspecting all residential, commercial and industrial jobs, 
approving electrical plans for new buildings, assisting the Fire Department in inspections of fires due to faulty electrical devices and 
seeing that permits are issued for repairs due to fire damage. 

Enforcement of fire alarm regulations for new homes, conducting and certifying inspections of schools, public buildings, day care 
center and nursing homes in conjunction with the building officials are part of the duties of electrical inspectors. Numerous 
electrical violations were investigated with the cooperation of Massachusetts Electric Company and corrected without incident. 

There were 699 permits issued in 1989 with a total of $37,781 in Fees collected. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTIONS 

The inspection and enforcement of plumbing and gas installations is 

controlled by a State Uniform Plumbing and Gas code formulated by the Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters 

under authority of Chapter 142 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

This office completes the inspection for permitting gas, plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Following the initial 
inspection, additional inspections are completed during construction to ensure compliance with State codes. A final inspection 
is conducted for the same purpose as well as to sign off on a Certificate of Occupancy. Complaints and violations must also be 
investigated and corrected or reported to the proper authorities. 

There were 459 plumbing permits issued with a total of $23,739.50 in fees collected, and 386 gas permits with a total of $9,165 
collected making a total of $32,904.50 in fees collected for the year 1990. 

SUMMARY OF FEES 

Building $276,182.00 

Electrical 37,781.00 

Plumbing and Gas 32.905.50 

Total Fees Collected $346,867.50 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Chapter 40A and 40B and the Town By-laws. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall Library, 
Memorial Hall, Elm Square, Second Floor. 

The five regular members and four associate members are appointed by the Selectmen and serve without pay. The public hearings 
by the Board are the result of applications in the following areas: 

1 . For a variance from the requirements of the By-laws. 

2. For a special permit under the By-laws. 

3. By a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building 
Inspector or other administrative officer. 

4. For permission to construct low or moderate income 
housing within the Town of Andover (Comprehensive Permit). 

34 



Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches requested, legal advertisements are published and 
abutters are notified, as required by law. The public hearings are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of 
Appeals Rules and Regulations. Following the hearing, the members of the Board, when it is considered desirable, view each 
property in question and thereafter hold a meeting, open to the public, at which the Board discusses the petitions which have been 
heard. Based on their views and the evidence presented at the hearing, a decision is rendered, signed and filed in the Town Clerk's 
office. 

During 1990 the Board held 12 regular meetings and 18 deliberation meetings. The Board considered 54 petitions and approved 
39. One petition was considered moot, one petition was postponed and one petition is pending. There were 4 applications 
withdrawn. 

Health Division 

The Health Division staff consists of a Director, Registered Sanitarian, a Health Code Enforcement Officer, one full-time Registered 
Nurse, one part-time Public Health Nurse and Administrative Secretary. The Division is structured to facilitate three operational 
objectives: administration of the Division, providing clinical public health services, addressing significant environmental 
responsibilities impacting health. 

During 1990, the Health Division has focused its attention on upgrading its data management, health education, and clinical 
programs. The initial phase of establishing a hazardous waste spills and release database was completed. Connection to a 
Statewide Information Exchange Network with other municipal health departments was established by computer/modem tie-in to 
the Massachusetts Health Officers Association system. 

Prevention is an integral and significant component of our public health services. Twenty-six new one-half hour programs on topics 
ranging from radon detection to septic system maintenance were produced for local public access cablevision. A three-hour course 
on Food Sanitation for restaurant owners/managers/shift supervisors was instituted utilizing slides and videos shot locally. 

Upon completion of the twenty-four hour OSHA Training Program, division personnel have been trained and equipped for limited 
local emergency response. Health Division staff using booms and absorbent pads now are capable of initiating a limited 
environmental protection response for such environmentally sensitive areas as Haggetts Pond and Fish Brook. 

Total revenue in the Health Division increased by about two percent in 1990 to a total of $47,372. This leveling off of growth in 
revenue is primarily attributable to a decrease in land development and building activity associated the current economic recession. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL 

The Health Division receives all reports of the reportable communicable disease cases and ensures these cases are investigated 
by the Public Health Nurse who sends a case record to the State Department of Public Health. Venereal Diseases are reported 
by the physician directly to the State. Preventing communicable diseases and containing them when they occur is a top priority 
of the Andover Health Department. 

Communicable diseases reported to the Health Department in 1990 are: 

Animal Bites 24 

Chicken Pox 133 

Hepatitis 2 

Meningitis 3 

Salmonella 13 

Pertussis 3 

Tuberculosis 1 

Campylobacter 1 1 

Giardia 6 

Malaria 1 

Shigella 1 

State regulations regarding reportable diseases are administered by the Public Health Nurse. Mantoux testing for exposure to 
tuberculosis, active disease detection, school and nursing home employment is done free of charge by the public health nurse. 

35 



Positive Mantoux reactors and active tuberculosis cases are followed and referred to the area Tuberculosis clinic at Lawrence 
General Hospital. The nurse takes histories, makes x-ray appointments, monitors medication, ensures proper blood tests are done 
and does (Snellen) eye exams on clinic patients. 

Mantoux testing 217 
Active Tuberculosis 

Investigation 1 

Reactor Follow-up 60 

Histories & Clinic cases 13 

Communicable Disease Case Records 42 

Cholesterol Screenings Clinics 

The Andover Health Division continued cholesterol clinics on a once a month basis except for July and August when no clinics were 
held. Screening was done in the Health Department Clinic/Nurses office. We participated in the Genetics Health Fair and screened 
forty-six employees. Our fee for the test at the Health Division was raised from three to five dollars to cover the increased cost of 
supplies. Two Public Health Nurses and a Health Division machine operator performed the testing and interviews. All clients were 
interviewed. Cholesterol education, recommendations and referral were part of this process. 

Andover Resident Cholesterol Screening Clinics 

Clinics 10 

Screened 181 

Elevated Result (>200) 125 

Genetics Health Fair 

Clinic 1 

Screened 46 

Elevated 17 

New State regulations require a letter of approval from the Department of Public Health, State Division of Health Care Quality, in 
order to do cholesterol screening. The Public Health Nurse attended a two day workshop, passed the screening test and received 
a certificate. After the necessary papers are submitted we will receive a Letter of Approval from the Department of Public Health 
which must be conspicuously displayed at every cholesterol screening clinic. The Letter of Approval must be renewed every two 
years. 

Influenza and Pneumovax Clinics 

Clinics were held for Andover residents over sixty for those with certain chronic diseases. The first clinic was held at Doherty Middle 
School on October 25, 1990, with the help of the Board of Health volunteer physician, two staff R.N.'s, two staff assistants, five 
volunteer R.N.'s and seven volunteer registrars. A second clinic was held at the Senior Center on November 8, 1990 with the two 
Public Health Nurses, and two volunteer R.N.'s, one Health Department staff assistant and four volunteer registrars. Vaccine was 
given to Academy Manor Nursing Home and Phillips Andover Nursing Home in Andover and they immunized their residents and 
staff. One hundred and one office immunizations were given and three home visits were made to immunize homebound Andover 
residents. 

Blood lead screening information and referral was provided to Andover residents by the public health nurse. Pediculosis 
screening, information and education are provided by the nurse to residents and groups on request. Scabies information and 
education is provided also to residents and groups on request. 

Amblyopia screening clinics were offered by the Andona Society free of charge to children of Andover residents age two through 
five. A special vision test is given and children who failed the test were referred to an ophthalmologist for follow-up. 

Colo-rectal screening kits provided by the American Cancer Society are distributed to Andover residents through the office for the 
Elderly Health Clinics. They are returned to the nurse and tested. Positive participants are referred to their physician. 



36 



26 


347 attended 


50 


793 attended 


361 





Immunization review, health record review, storage of medication and other medical regulations affecting recreational camps for 
children are enforced through inspection and license withdrawal if the requirements are not met. 

Elderly Health Services 

This program promotes, health, maintains health and prevents diseases in Andover's senior citizen population. Clinics are held at 
the Housing for the Elderly and at the Andover Commons on a monthly basis. Weekly clinics are held at the Senior Center. Tests 
include vital signs, urine testing, hemoglobin testing and weight. Each person receives counselling (diet, medication and referral 
to M.D.'s of area agencies as needed.) 

Outreach Clinics 
Senior Center Clinics 
Office Visits 
Home Visits 

An Easy Exercise Program is directed by Mrs. Wilson, R.N., Public Health Nurse. It involves range of motion exercises, walking, 
dancing and health education. All participants are required to get permission signatures from their physicians and many do the 
exercises at home, as well as in the class. 

Fifty-five classes were held at the Senior Center in 1990 and one thousand and ninety-five residents attended. 

Biologies 

Andover does not offer immunization clinics to its residents but does provide biologies free of charge to Andover physicians and 
schools. The Public Health Nurse monitors distribution and usage of the vaccines. Some vaccines are ordered from the 
Department of Public Health and some are picked up by the nurse at the Regional Office in Tewksbury. 

Information to area clinics, schools and physicians on various vaccines and those needed for international travel, is provided by 
the nurse and referral is made to vaccination sites. 

Board and Committees 

The Public Health Nurse serves on the following boards and committees . 

VNA Home Care - Professional Advisory Committee 

Elder Services of Merrimack Valley Advisory Board & 

Long Range Planning Committee 

Welfare Advisory Board 

Fidelity House Human Rights Committee 

Conferences and Meetings 

The Public Health Nurses attend seminars and conferences. They obtain Continuing Education Credits which are necessary to 
renew their licenses in Massachusetts. 

Highlights of 1990 

Cholesterol clinics continue to be popular. Preventing heart disease and promoting better health have been the goals of this 
program. These clinics will continue on a monthly basis in 1991. 

BE WISE - IMMUNIZE 

Immunizing pre-school and school children at the proper time against Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio, Hib, Measles, Mumps 
and Rubella can prevent these communicable diseases and their sometimes serious effects. We had three cases of Pertussis in 
Andover in 1 990. 

Immunizing elders and those with chronic diseases against influenza and pneumonia has protected almost one thousand Andover 
residents. These diseases can lead to serious complications and even death in elders and those with chronic diseases. 

37 



Immunizing elders and those with chronic diseases against influenza and pneumonia has protected almost one thousand Andover 
residents. These diseases can lead to serious complications and even death in elders and those with chronic diseases. 

Foodborne illnesses (Salmonella, Campylobacter) increased this year. Swift investigation when these cases are reported is vital 
to preventing a possible outbreak. Restricting food handlers with these illnesses until quarantine regulations were met prevented 
a possible outbreak in two situations this year. 

The stricter leash law reduced reports of animal bites by almost half this year. 

I CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

WETLAND PROTECTION 

During 1990 the Conservation Commission under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, conducted ninety (90) public 
hearings, issued Determinations of Applicability (60), acted on Notices of Intent (23), issued Orders of Condition (22), Amendments 
(8), Extensions of Permit (6), Certificates of Compliance (48), Enforcement Orders (8), and Findings of Insignificance for Proposed 
Plan Changes (3). 

Under the provisions of the Massachusetts Wetland Protection Act the Conservation Commission collected filing fees in the amount 
of seven thousand four hundred seven dollars and fifty cents ($7,407.50). 

WETLAND MAPS 

Eight Final Wetland Map Boundary Changes were approved. A five-year drafting back-log of accumulated Wetland Map Boundary 
Changes previously approved by the commission was eliminated. 

LAND ACQUISITION 

With the balance of the 1987 Conservation Fund Appropriation (Article 21) in 1990 the Conservation Commission acquired a number 
of important properties and rights in furtherance of the goals stated in the "OPEN SPACE AND OUTDOOR RECREATION PLAN". 
Among these were the following four parcels, totaling 28.38 acres: 

1. A Conservation Easement over the Barron's Country Store wetlands which are tributary to Haggetts Pond; and the petroleum 
(gasoline) storage rights; 

2. Acquisition in fee simple of two properties on Foster's Pond at Glenwood Road Extension, totaling eight acres (providing for 
the first time a Town-owned public access point to the pond); 

3. Approximately fifteen acres at Gray Road, including the gift of four and one-half acres, was added to the commission's 
property at Tucker Road. This acquisition further extends the greenbelt which links open space areas, and protects over eight- 
hundred feet of the Skug River. 

The average cost per acre for the total acreage acquired in fee simple through negotiated purchase in 1 990 was $7,858. 

Without expenditure of Town funds other important open space and resource protection measures were achieved in 1 990. Among 
these were: 

1. Establishment of a permanent statutory Conservation Restriction over the stream, wetland and floodplain associated with the 
Cobblestone Lane Subdivision; and 

2. "Gifts" of various permanent open space areas as a result of cluster subdivision development. 

MUNICIPAL LEAF COMPOSTING PROGRAM 

The Conservation Commission entered into an agreement with the Department of Public Works to operate a municipal leaf 
composting program on a portion of the Bald Hill Reservation on High Plain Road. James Bamford of the Municipal Maintenance 
Dept. reports that an estimated two hundred and eighty-eight tons of leaves were dropped off at the site during the period from 
October 18 through November 24, 1990. This volume was therefore removed from the waste flow of refuse and is being composted 

38 



for eventual use by Town departments and citizens. This program places the Town in compliance with State-mandated solid waste 
disposal regulations. 

LAND MANAGEMENT 

The Conservation Overseers conducted a clean-up and beautrfication of conservation areas throughout the Town. 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 



The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. Regular Meetings are held on the second Thursday of every month, 
and the annual meeting is held during the month of June. Meetings are conducted in the main office, on the second floor of the 
Recreation Hall in Stowe Court. 

In march, Chairman Richard A. Savrann retired from the Board of Director's after nineteen years of service. Mr. John C. Hess was 
elected to a five year term on the Board in March. 

At the annual meeting held on June 13, 1990, MaryJane Powell was elected to serve as Chairperson by the Board of Director's. 
The following officers were elected for a one year term: 

Mary Jane Powell - Chairperson 

Ronald Hajj -Vice Chairman 

Eileen Connolly -Treasurer 

Francis McNulty -Asst. Treasurer 

John C. Hess -Member 

Nancy M. Marcoux -Secretary 

The Andover Housing Authority is funded under the Executive Office of Communities and Development (EOCD). The Town of 
Andover has absolutely no financial obligation in the construction or operation of these housing projects. 

Chapter 667 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of Elderly Housing which are located in chestnut Courts (42 units), Grandview 
Terrace (40 units), Frye Circle (96 units), and Stowe Court (40 units). The average monthly rent this year in the elderly units was 
$140.00. The income limits for elderly housing are: 

One person: $19,488.00 Two people: $22,272.00 

There is also an asses limit of $15,000.00 in order to qualify. During the past year, (1990), twenty-four tenants moved into elderly 
housing. 

Chapter 200-1 

The Andover Housing Authority manages fifty-six units of Family Housing including two, three, and four bedroom units. The income 
limits for Family Housing are as follows: 

Two people: $22,272.00 Five people: $29,580.00 

Three people: 25,056.00 Six people : 31,320.00 

Four people: 27,840.00 Seven people: 33,060.00 

Eight people: $34,800.00 

The average monthly rent for 1990 was $291.00. During 1990, nine new families moved into Family Housing. 

Section 8 Housing Assistance Program (Federal Funds-HUD) 

The Andover Housing Authority has 59 Certificates under this Federally subsidized program, which permits participants to live in 
private accommodations, paying approximately 30% of their adjusted income toward rent. The total rent for the apartment can 
not exceed the Fair Market Rent for that size unit. The Fair Market Rent is mandated by HUD. The Housing Authority pays the 
difference in rent directly to the landlord. The condition of the unit must meet basic housing standards, and is inspected annually. 

39 



Section 8 Vouchers. Under the Voucher Program, participants are allowed greater flexibility in locating an apartment, since the 
FMR does not have to be adhered to. If a participant leased an apartment which exceeds the Fair Market Rent set for that size 
unit, the participant is responsible for paying the difference in rent. The Housing Authority will only subsidize the tenant based on 
the FMR. Presently this Program is 100% leased. 

Chapter 707 Rental Assistance Program (STATE FUNDS) 

This State Program is basically the same as the Federal Program except that these certificates must be used in the Town of 
Andover. The Housing Authority has thirty-one certificates which assist low income elderly and families under this program. The 
applicant pays approximately 25% of their adjusted income towards rent, (as compared with 30% under the Federal Program), and 
the Housing Authority pays the difference. There is a separate maximum rent schedule under the 707 Program which is slightly 
higher the Section 8 FMR. 

Chapter 689 

This is the seventh year that Fidelity House has been in operation. It is located within the Memorial Circle Project adjacent to 
Rogers Brook, and houses seven handicapped persons and one full-time counselor. The monthly rent received from Fidelity House 
in 1990 was $1000.00. 

Accomplishments 

The final phase of our Modernization Program is currently underway. Improvements are scheduled at both the elderly and family 

complexes. 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The Library has been experiencing ever increasing use each year since the completion of the renovation. Circulation of materials 
is the highest it has ever been with almost 450,000 transactions. The number of recorded Reference questions was almost 30,000, 
our highest ever. 

The year's theme was "Patron Assistance." Staff provided brochures on availability and locations of materials for easier public 
access. Library policies for the various media were distributed. Particular concentration was devoted to helping the jobless with 
brochures, books, tapes and videos on resumes, interviews and finding jobs. Another area was that of foreign language guides 
showing the multi media materials available at the library. Materials in Chines, Russian and English as a second language were 
increased to accommodate some of the newest residents in Andover. Because of the tremendous demands more compact discs 
and Books on Tape were added. 

The new software for Patron Access Terminals was a great step towards a new user friendly system. Along with that, Andover's 
patrons now have access to world-wide inter-library loan through OCLC. 

There were many excellent programs, often with standing room only. The programs included speakers and authors, Sophie Freud, 
Elizabeth Winthrop, Betsy Williams, John Bellair, Andrew Coburn, and Susan Kelley. Excellent musical programs sponsored by 
the Friends included Chinese violinist, We-Zen-Ni, Russian flutist Lenord Mironovich, formerly of the Moscow Symphony. The 
concerts were made possible by a special gift of a Baldwin piano by the Friend of the Library. The Andona Society and the Arts 
Lottery supported many of the programs. 

Andover residents borrowed more books through Interlibrary Loan than ever before. Because of our connection with an 
international bibliographic utility, OCLC, we received books from all over and had requests for our books from England, Denmark, 
and the FBI. 

Probably the single most popular thing the library did was to exhibit a nine foot high stuffed Kodiak bear. 

The Friends of the Library worked hard all year to raise money for museum passes and the many programs they sponsored. 

The Spade and Trowel Garden Club provided special Christmas decorations this year as they have for many years. 

This is probably the last year of optimum services. The Library Staff will continue to provide the best service possible but the public 
must be aware of the limits to service imposed by excessive budget restraints. 



40 



37 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 12, 1990 



Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, February 5, 1990, the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Andover qualified to vote in Town Affairs 
were to have met and assembled in the Memorial Auditorium, Bartlet Street 
in said Andover on Monday, March 12, 1990 at 7:00 P.M. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables 
of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of the said Town to 
meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant by 
posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hail, on each 
school house and in no less than five other public places where bills and 
notices are usually posted and by publication in the Andover TOWNSMAN. 
Said warrants have been posted and published fourteen days. 

Joseph Axelrod 
Constable 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator James D. Doherty at 7:04 P.M. 
Upon motion by Town Counsel Alfred Daniels and duly seconded it was voted 
to move the Special Town Meeting to the Collins Center on Shawsheen Poad, 
Andover. 

The meeting was reconvened by Moderator James D. Doherty at 7:18 P.M. at 
the Collins Center, Shawsheen Poad in said Andover. 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 578 voters admitted 
to the meeting. 

The opening prayer was offered by Pev. Dr. Jack L. Daniel of Free Christian 
Church. 

Salute to the Flag was led by Selectman Gail L. Palston. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 14 non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Collins 
Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted that the Moderator refer 
to the article by number and by subject matter. 

It was agreed by the meeting members that Article 1 would be taken in two 
motions. 

ARTICLE 1. 



Motion I: To see if the Town will vote the following appropriations as 

voted at the Annual Town Meeting on April 3, 1989 be reduced by the following 

amounts: 

General Government - Personal Services $ 79,312 

Municipal Maintenance - Personal Services 115,283 

Public Safety - Personal Services 25,000 

Public Safety - Other Expenses 12,000 

Public Works - Other Expenses 99,000 

Community Development - Personal Services 77,000 

Community Services - Personal Services 55,150 

Compensation Fund 70,000 

Health Insurance Fund 68,000 

Total Reduction $600, 745 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was read by Joanne Marden. 



41 



JO 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 12, 1990 

Amendment to Article 1 Motion I : To see if the Town will vote $17,500 to 
town government for the elderly program and $17,500 for the school department 
from Bus state reimbursement funds. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded the amendment was DEFEATED by a 
majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 1 

Motion I as originally moved by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 1. 

Motion II: To see if the Town will vote the following appropriations as voted 

at the Annual Town Meeting on April 3, 1989 be reduced by the following amounts: 

Andover Public Schools - Personal Services $u39,717 
Andover Public Schools - Other Expenses 130,283 

Total Reduction $570,000 

A report by the Andover School Committee was read by Margo Tilghman. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 1 Motion II 
be accepted as moved by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to approve the acceptance by the 
Greater Lawrence Pegional Vocational Technical High School District of (1) 
Chapter 70A of the General Laws relating to an Equal Educational Opportunity 
Grant. 

A report by the School Committee was read by Margo Tilghman. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 2 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 
APTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Section HI of Chapter 653, Acts of 1989, relative to quarterly property 
tax billing. 

A report by the Finance Committee was read by Frederic Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 3 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 
ARTICLE U. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Section 40 of Chapter 653, Acts of 1989, relative to change in assessment 
date for property tax billing purposes. 

A report by the Finance Committee was read by Theodore Taylor. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 4 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 



42 



39 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 12, 1990 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Alfred Daniels and duly seconded 
it was VOTED to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 8:t5 P.M. 

ATTEST 



Pandall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



43 



4 ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION MAPCH 26, 1990 



In the name of the Commonwealth you are required to notify and warn 
Inhabitants of the Town who are qualified to vote in the election to vote 
at all eight precincts: Precinct One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, 
and Eight; single polling place to be located at the Dunn Gymnaisium, 
Andover High School, Shawsheen Poad, in Andover on: 

MONDAY, MAPCH 26, 1990 

from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Town Election for the election of candidates 
for the following offices: 

MODEPATOP For one year 

SELECTMAN (ONE) For three years 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (ONE) For three years 

ANDOVEP HOUSING AUTHOPITY (ONE) For five years 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said 
Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said 
warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, 
on each school house, and in no less than five other public places where 
bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in the Andover 
Townsman . Said warrants have been posted and published fourteen days. 

John F. Manning 
Constable 

The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. The 
polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock P.M. 
The total number of ballots cast was 2,895, viz: 

Prec. 1 - 354 
Prec. 2 - 383 



MODEPATOP FOP ONE YEAP 



Prec. 


3 - 


- 399 


Prec. 


5 ■ 


■ 334 


Prec. 


7 - 


- 417 


Prec. 


4 ■ 


- 370 


Prec. 


6 ■ 


- 325 


Prec. 


8 - 


■ 313 



282 


293 


293 


261 


223 


253 


318 


220 


James D. Doner ty 


2143 


64 


73 


91 


98 


99 


60 


81 


87 


John Doyle 


653 


8 


17 


15 


11 


12 


12 


18 


6 


Blanks 

SELECTMAN 

ONE FOP THPEE YEAPS 


99 


220 


226 


235 


195 


167 


184 


220 


167 


William T. Downs 


1614 


127 


147 


156 


162 


162 


127 


180 


135 


Susan K. O'Neill 


1196 


7 


10 


8 


13 


5 


14 


17 


11 


Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
ONE FOP THPEE YEAPS 


85 


66 


43 


20 


37 


31 


21 


28 


37 


Joseph M. Frio, Jr. 


283 


62 


64 


86 


66 


57 


68 


45 


66 


Tony Mendoza 


514 


91 


126 


134 
1 


118 


132 


159 


262 

1 


99 


Christopher M. Outwin 
Donald Pobb 
Puth Scarbeau 


1121 
1 
1 


71 


74 


72 


78 


77 


56 


39 


69 


Debra Silberstein 


536 


64 


76 


86 


71 


37 


21 


42 


42 


Blanks 


439 


















ANDOVEP HOUSING AUTHOPITY 


















ONE FOP. FIVE YEARS 




276 


279 


305 


272 


234 


247 


310 


240 


John P. Hess 


2163 


78 


104 


94 


98 


100 


78 


107 


73 


Blanks 


732 



A true record 
ATTEST 



f^^Kj^U^^/-^^UlU 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 

44 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 11, 1990 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, May 7, 1990, the 
Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Town Affairs to 
meet and assemble at the J. Everett Collins Center for the Performing 
Arts on Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, 

MONDAY, THE ELEVENTH DAY OF JUNE, 1990 

at 7:00 o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in 
said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the 
Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public 
places where bills and notices are usually posted by publication in the 
Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been posted and published fourteen 
days. 

John F. Manning 

Constable 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 1,888 voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 
7:00 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Father Francis Gallogly of St. 
Augustine's Church, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman Gail L. Ralston. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 12 non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the 
Collins Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and the return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator 
refer to the article by number and subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three 

years, one member of the School Committee for three years, one member of 

the Andover Housing Authority for five years and other Town Officers 

required by law to be elected by ballot. _„ Tn . 

ELLC J ION 

Town Clerk Randall L. Hanson announced the results of the election 
on March 26, 1990 and that the successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices had been sworn to the faithful performances of the 
duties of their office: 

James D. Doherty - Moderator for One Year 
William T. Downs - Selectman for Three Years 
Christopher M. Outwin - School Committee for Three Years 
John P. Hess - Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected 

by ballot. ELECTION NOT 

REQUIRED BY 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Edwin T. Riedel be BALLOT 
elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years by majority vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1990, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter hu, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefore, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. REVENUE 

ANTICIPATION 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 3 be fjORFOWING 
approved as printed in the Warrant by majority vote. 

45 



42 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 11, 1990 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money 
the Town will raise and appropriate, including appropriations from available 
BUDGET funds, to defray charges and expenses of the Town, including debt and interest, 
and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 1990, 
and ending June 30, 1991. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money: 



1 PERSONAL SERVICES 



2 OTHER EXPENSES 



3 PERSONAL SERVICES 



4 OTHER EXPENSES 



5 PERSONAL SERVICES 



6 OTHER EXPENSES 



7 PERSONAL SERVICES 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 



9 PERSONAL SERVICES 



10 OTHER EXPENSES 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Including $152, 474 in department 

receipts $2,106,295.00 

Including $9,275 for out-of-state 
travel and $115,210 in department 
receipts 994,700.00 

Total Appropriated 3,100,995.00 

From Taxation 2,833,311.00 

MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

Including investment income of $27,000 

from Cemetery reserve 1,581,271.00 

Including $56,000 from rental income 1,832,972.00 

Total Appropriated 3,414,243.00 

From Taxation 3,331,243.00 

PUBLIC SAFETY 



Including $60,000 from Ambulance 
Receipts 



5,816,125.00 



Including $6,600 for out-of-state travel 



and $75,000 from Ambulance Receipts 
Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 
PUBLIC WORKS 



Including out-of-state travel in the 
amount of $5,100 



Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 

LIBRARY 

Including $60,775 from Merrimack Valley 
Library Consortium 

Including out-of-state travel in the 
amount of $900 and $19,771 in State 
Library aid and $24,000 from 
Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



525,169.00 
6,341,294.00 
6,206,294.00 

1,672,160.00 

4,810,400.00 
6,482,560.00 
6,482,560.00 

932,016.00 

392,965.00 
1,324,981.00 
1,220,435.00 



46 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



JUNE 11, 1990 



UNCLASSIFIED 



11 COMPENSATION FUND 

12 RESERVE FUND 



13 PERSONAL SERVICES 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 



15 



Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 
ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Including out-of-state travel in the 
amount of $8,000 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



FIXED 

16 INTEREST EXPENSE 

17 BOND REDEMPTION Including $50,000 from Parking 

Meter Receipts 

18 STABILIZATION FUND 

19 INSURANCE EXPENSES 

20 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

21 RETIREMENT - PERSONAL SERVICES 

22 RETIREMENT - OTHER EXPENSES 

23 CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

24 NON-CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

25 RETIREMENT FUND Including $214,000 from Special 

Pension Reserve Fund 

26 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 

Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 
TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION 
TOTAL FROM TAXATION 



60,000.00 
200,000.00 
260,000.00 
260,000.00 

18,139,703.00 

4,332,114.00 
22,471,817.00 
22,471,817.00 

88,315.00 
88,315.00 

2,914,102.00 

3,727,700.00 

60,000.00 

997,500.00 

100,000.00 

32,573.00 

16,135.00 

1,218,945.00 

78,000.00 

455,834.00 
2,350,000.00 

11,950,789.00 

11,686,789.00 

55,434,994.00 

54,580,764.00 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation 
the sum of $1,500,000 and appropriate $700,000 for Municipal 
Maintenance; $480,000 for Andover Public Schools; and $320,000 
for Town Departments for the Fiscal Year beginning July first, 
nineteen hundred and ninety, contingent upon subsequent approval 
of a ballot question allowing the Town of Andover to assess an 
additional $1,500,000 in Real Estate and Personal Property 
Taxes . 



Article 5 was WITHDRAWN. 



47 



44 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 11, 1990 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Article 12 Unpaid Bills - M.S.P.C.A. $ 99.00 

Article 44 Sidewalk - Clark Road 35,000.00 

Article 75 Traffic Signal - High 6 Haverhill Streets 27,000.00 

TOTAL $62,099.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Article 10 Unexpended Balances 8,938.29 

To: Free Cash 

From: Article 67-1986 Town Meeting 

Improvements 879.72 

Article 69-1986 Patriotic Ob- 
servances 2.30 

Article 22-1980 Motor Control - 

Fish Brook 2,621.02 

Article 38-1978 Master Plan 253.85 

Article 15-1988 Lantern Road 

Sewer 5,181.40 

Article 14 Budget Transfer FY 1990 

To: Debt Service - Interest Expense 60,000.00 

From: Insurance - Other Expenses 60,000.00 



TOTAL $68,938.29 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 



Article 46 Traffic Lights - Frontage Road and 

Lowell Street 110,000.00 

TOTAL $110,000.00 

Article 9 Free Cash - $670,000 to be used to 

reduce FY 1991 Tax Rate 

Article 53 Bond Authorization Rescission 

Article 26-1985 Annual Town Meeting/Sewer/ 

Lowell Street 65,000.00 

Article 29-1986 Annual Town Meeting/Old Town 

Hall Engineering/Design 150,000.00 

Article 18-1987 Annual Town Meeting/School 

Computers 325,000.00 



A true record 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



•X_ 



48 



45 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 11, 1990 

ARTICLE 6. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the 
ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the salaries of 
elected Town Officials be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $125 for each Annual Town Meeting and 

$30.00 for each Special Town Meeting 
except when it falls within the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Selectmen - Chairman - $1,500.00 SALARIES OF 

Members - $1,200.00 ELECTED OFFICIALS 

School Committee - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members - $1,200.00 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter into 
contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds allotted to 
Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government under 
any State or Federal grant program. GRANT PROGRAMS 

AUTHORIZATION 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 7 as 
printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to 
enter into a contract with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works 
Commissioners, the County Commissioners and/or either of them for the 
construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover 
for the ensuing year. ROAD CONTRACTS 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 8 
as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 9. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to 
use in free cash to reduce the 1990-91 tax rate and to effect appropriations 
voted at the 1990 Annual Town Meeting. FFEE CASH 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town Assessors 
be permitted to use $670,000 in free cash to reduce the Fiscal Year 1991 
tax rate and to effect appropriations voted at the 1 990 Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 10. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended 

appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the following 
balances be lapsed and returned to certified free cash: 

Town Meeting Improvements $ 879.72 

Patriotic Observances 2.30 

Motor Control - Fish Brook 2,621.02 

Master Plan 253.85 

Lantern Road Sewer 5,181.40 

8,938.29 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire 
any necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain 
for Chapter 90 Highway Construction. CHPTR 90 ROAD EASEMENTS 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 11 as 
printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds 
a sum not to exceed $5,000 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation was 
incurred in prior Fiscal Years. UNPAID BILLS 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to transfer from available 
funds the sum of $99.00 to pay the following unpaid bills incurred in a prior 
fiscal year: 

Vendor Amount Using Department 

M.S.P.C.A. $99.00 Public Safety - Police 

The VOTE was UNANIMOUS - more than 4/5 required. 

49 



Article 


67 


- 


1986 


Article 


69 


- 


1986 


Article 


22 


- 


1980 


Article 


38 


- 


1978 


Article 


15 


- 


1988 


ARTICLE 11. ' 


ro see if 



4t> 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 11, 1990 

ARTICLE 13. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 
TOWN 

REPORT Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 13 

as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum not to exceed 
TOWN $300,000 from amounts previously appropriated at the April 3, 1989, Annual 
BUDGET Town Meeting as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
TRANSFERS Section 33B. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to transfer the sum of 
$60,000 from Insurance - Other Expenses and appropriate $60,000 to Debt 
Service - Interest Expense by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds 
SUPPLEMENTAL^ sum not to excee( j $200,000 and appropriate to Interest Expense - Fiscal 
APPR0PRIA - Year 1990# 
TION - INTEREST 

Article 15 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
STREET way, Westminster Roadway, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 
ACCEPT. - Planning Board entitled, "Definitive Plan Andover Country Club Section I" 
WESTMINSTER dated June 1, 1979 and recorded with Essex North District Registry of 
ROADWAY Deeds as Plan Number 8202. 

On petition of Anne Kruse and others. 

Article 16 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 17. Upon motion made and duly seconded the following street 
acceptance articles were combined and said roads were accepted by ONE 
STREET MAJORITY VOTE. All roads have been approved by the engineering depart- 
ACCLPT. - ment and Town Counsel and have been properly laid out by the Selectmen. 
SHADOW LN. , 

WOKTHEN PL. , A report by the Andover Planning Board was made by Susan Stott. 
ENDICOTT RD. , 

WLSCOTT RD. , Article 17 - Shadow Lane - as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 

HASKELL P-^ •» pi ann i n g Board entitled, "Definitive Plan Andover Country Club Section I" 

INWQOD LN. , d ate( j j une i f lg 79 ana - recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds 

0FCHAPD as Plan Number 8202. 
CROSSING , 

WESTMINSTER 0n pet i t i on of Ann e Kruse and others. 
ROADWAY (PORTION) , 

Article 18 - Worthen Place - as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 

Planning Board entitled, "Definitive Plan Andover Country Club Section I" 
dated June 1, 1979 and recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds 
as Plan Number 8202. 

On petition of Anne Kruse and others. 

Article 19 - Endicott Road - as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 
Planning Board entitled, "Definitive Plan Andover Country Club Section I" 
dated June 1, 1979 and recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds 
as Plan Number 8202. 

On petition of Anne Kruse and others. 

Article 20 - Wescott Road - as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 
Planning Board entitled, "Definitive Plan Andover Country Club Section I" 
dated June 1, 1979 and recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds 
as Plan Number 8202. 

On petition of Anne Kruse and others. 

Article 21 - Haskell Road - as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 
Planning Board entitled, "Definitive Plan Andover Country Club Section I" 
dated June 1, 1979 and recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds 
as Plan Number 8202. 

On petition of Anne Kruse and others. 



50 



47 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 11, 1990 



Article 22 - Inwood Lane - as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 
Planning Board entitled, "Definitive Plan of River Edge Subdivision Plan 
of Land in Andover, Mass. of Inwood Lane" dated March 16, 1984 and recorded 
with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 9491. 

On petition of Anne Kruse and others. 

Article 23 - Orchard Crossing - as shown on a plan which was approved by 

the Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "TURNER 

FARM ESTATES, DEFINITIVE PLAN" which plan is recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 8947. 

Also as shown on plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of Land of Orchard 
Crossing in Andover, Mass." as prepared for Magee Construction Company, Inc. 
of Arlington, dated January 2, 1990. 

On petition of John E. Magee, Jr. and others. 

Article 36 - Westminster Roadway (portion) - as shown on a plan approved 
by the Andover Planning Board entitled, "Definitive Plan Andover Country Club 
Section I" dated June 1, 1979 and recorded with Essex North District Registry 
of Deeds as Plan Number 8202. 

On petition of Anne Kruse and others. 

Article 37 - Chippy Lane - as shown on plan which was approved by the 
Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled, "Sub- 
division and Acceptance Plan 'Chippy Lane' Andover, Mass." Owner and 
Applicant: Louis 6 Florence M. Curdo, 97 Argilla Road, Andover, MA 01810; 
Scale: 1" = 40'; Date: July 11, 1986, Revised August 11, 1986; Surveyor: 
Andover Consultants, Inc., which plan is recorded with the North District 
of Essex County Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 10491. 

On petition of Louis Curdo and others. 

ARTICLE 24 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Granli Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 
Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan 
of Granli Estates Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. of Granli 
Drive dated 10/16/84, revised 12/15/84, revised 2/7/85, Dana F. 
Perkins 6 Associates, Engineers and Surveyors", which plan is recorded 
at the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 9649. 

STREET 
ACCEPTANCE 
GRANLI DR. 
Article 24 was WITHDPAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 



On petition of Joan M. Sweeney and others. 



ARTICLE 25 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Laconia Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Planning 
Board said way being shown on a plan entitled, "Subdivision Plan of Land 
in Andover, Mass., Sheet 7 of 30, Scale: 1" = 100', dated: October 23, 
1980, prepared by Dana F. Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc.", said plan recorded at 
the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8556. 

STREET 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. ACCEPTANCE 

LACONIA DR. 

Article 25 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Acropolis Circle, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Planning 

Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled, "Subdivision Plan of Land 

in Andover, Mass., Sheet 7 of 30, Scale: 1" = 100', dated October 23, 1980, 

prepared by Dana F. Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc.", said plan recorded at the Essex 

North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8556. 

6 STREET 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. ACCEPTANCE 

* ACROPOLIS CIR. 

Article 26 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 



51 



4.8 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 11, 1990 

ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Messinia Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Planning 
Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land 
in Andover, Mass., Sheet 7 of 30, Scale: 1" = 100', dated: October 23, 1980, 
prepared by Dana F. Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc.", said plan recorded at the Essex 
North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8556. 

STREET 

ACCEPTANCE - On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

MESSINIA DR. 

Article 27 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 28 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Odyssey Way, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Planning 
Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled, "Subdivision Plan of 
Land in Andover, Mass., Sheet 7 of 30, Scale: 1" = 100', dated: 
October 23, 1980, prepared by Dana F. Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc.", said 
plan recorded at the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8556. 

STREET 

ACCEPTANCE - On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

ODYSSEY WAY 

Article 28 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 29 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Sparta Way, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Planning 
Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land 
in Andover, Mass., Sheet 7 of 30, Scale: 1" = 100', dated: October 23, 1980 
prepared by Dana F. Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc.", said plan recorded at the Essex 
North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8556. 

STREET 

ACCEPTANCE - On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

SPARTA WAY 

Article 29 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 30 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Doric Way, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Planning 
Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled, "Subdivision Plan of 
Land in Andover, Mass., Sheet 7 of 30, Scale: 1" = 100', dated 
October 23, 1980, prepared by Dana F. Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc.", said plan 
recorded at the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8556. 

STREET 

ACCEPTANCE - On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

DORIC WAY 

Article 30 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Hearthstone Place, as shown on a plan which was approved by the 
Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan 
of Hearthstone Village, Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. of 
Hearthstone Place, Scale 1" = 100', Date: March 14, 1987" which plan is 
recorded with the Essex North Registry of Deeds Number 10807. 

STREET 

ACCEPTANCE - On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

HEARTHSTONE PL. 

Article 31 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 32 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Yardley Road, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning 
Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan of Belmont Park in 
Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and recorded with Essex North District 
Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6985. 



STREET 



On petition of Donald L. Thompson and others. 



ACCEPTANCE - Article 32 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 
YARDLEY RD. 

ARTICLE 33 . To see if the Town will vote to' accept and name as a public 
way, a portion of Yardley Road, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 
Planning Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan of Belmont 
Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6985. 

STREET 

ACCEPTANCE - On petition of Donald L. Thompson and others. 

YARDLEY RD. 

(PORTION OF) Article 33 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

52 



49 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 11, 1990 



ARTICLE 34 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Colonial Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 
Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Colonial Hill at 
Andover Subdivision and Acceptance Plan", which is recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as plan number 10062. Scale 1" =40', dated 
June 1, 1985. 

STREET 

On petition of Dorothy Rossetti and others. ACCEPTANCE - 

COLONIAL DR. 
Article 34 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 35 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Patriot Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 

Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Colonial Hill at 

Andover Subdivision and Acceptance Plan", which plan is recorded with 

Essex North Registry of Deeds as plan number 10062. Scale 1" = 40', 

dated June 1, 1985. 

STREET 

On petition of Dorothy Rossetti and others. ACCEPTANCE 

K J PATRIOT DR. 

Article 35 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 
ARTICLE 36. SEE ARTICLE 17 



ARTICLE 37. SEE ARTICLE 17 

ARTICLE 38 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Pole Hill Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by Planning 
Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled, "Definitive Plan of 
Waterford Place, Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, of Pole Hill Drive, 
Scale 1" = to', dated April 7, 1982, Owner T.D.J. Development Corporation, 
Engineers, Dana Perkins and Associates, Inc.", said plan recorded at the 
Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8906. 

STREET 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. ACCEPTANCE - 

POLE HILL DR. 

Article 38 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 39 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Nicoll Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Planning 

Board said way being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land 

in Andover, Mass., Sheet 7 of 30, Scale: 1" = 100*, Dated: October 23, 

1980, prepared by Dana F. Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc." said plan recorded at 

the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8556. 

STREET 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. ACCEPTANCE - 

NICOLL DR. 

Article 39 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE tO . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Heritage Lane, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 
Planning Board, said lane being shown on a plan entitled "Heritage Estates" 
which plan is recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
8635, dated March 23, 1981 and revised on April 23, 1981." 

STREET 
On petition of James R. Butler and others. ACCEPTANCE - 

HERITAGE LANE 
Article 40 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT. 

ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town will vote to take by eminent domain and 
name as a public way, Hammond Way, completed by the Town after bond default 
and as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover Planning Board, 
said way being shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 
Hammond Way in Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', Sept. 8, 1989, Dana F. 
Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc., Prepared for the Town of Andover." Also as shown 
on Plan #9194 recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Hooks Johnston. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 41 

as printed in the Warrant. 

STREET 

The VOTE was UNANIMOUS. More than 2/3 required. ACCEPTANCE - 

HAMMOND WAY 



53 



50 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



JUNE 11, 1990 



PROPERTY 

TAX 

EXEMPTIONS 



DASCOMB RD. 

SEWER 

EASEMENT 



ARTICLE 42 . To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of 
the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax exemption for 
Fiscal Year 1991 to those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions 
under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 
42 as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 



Selectmen to accept by gift a sewer easement from the Digital Equipment 
Corporation on Dascomb Road at the Tewksbury town line as shown on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, Mass., Digital Equipment Corp. to the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, Scale 1" = 50', John Avery, Jr., Town 
Engineer, July 24, 1989" filed in the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan #11673, and the easement as document number 25597 of 
November 24, 1989. 

A report from the Andover Planning Board was read by Carl Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 43 
as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 



CLARK RD. 
SIDEWALK 



ARTICLE 44 . To see if the 
sum of $35,000 for the cons 
sidewalks at the following 
distances: CLARK ROAD - we 
and Dascomb Road . . . 780 
by transfer from available 
the foregoing; and further 
by gift, by purchase or by 
as may be required for thes 
thereto. 



Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
truction of granite-curbed bituminous concrete 
locations and for the indicated approximate 
st side to finish portion between Hall Avenue 
feet +/-; said sum to be raised by taxation, 
funds, by borrowing or by any combination of 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
seizure by right of eminent domain such land 
e sidewalks; or take any other action related 



RETIREMENT 
BENEFITS 



On petition of Jean Verzola-Henry and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approved Article 44 
as written in the Warrant in the amount of $3 5,000 from available funds 
by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 45 . To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept Chapter 32, 
Sections 90 A, C, D, of Mass. General Laws, at the specified maximum of 
50% as allowed; and to appropriate an amount of $35,000 from available 
funds for Fiscal Year 1991. 

Article 45 was DEFEATED 

Yes - 298 No - 339 More than 2/3 vote is required 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED 
to adjourn at 10:40 P.M. until Tuesday, June 12, 1990 at 7:00 P.M. at 
the J. Everett Collins Performing Arts Center on Shawsheen Road. 



54 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 435 voters admitted 
to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 
7:35 P.M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 7 non-voters to the meeting. 



TRAFFIC 
SIGNALS 



ARTICLE 46 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 

transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of 

the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $110,000.00 for the purpose 

of completing construction of the traffic lights designed for the Ppn . 

intersections of Frontage Road at Dascomb Road and Lowell Street at — ■ — - — — '-— 

■ j » j j !.■ ^ • 4 *-• a ■ DASCOMB 6 

Haggetts Pond Road and making any other intersection roadway improve- — 

ments needed by the installation of these lights and to authorize the „ „ „„, — 

„ , . . J . ,. . . . j , ^ w HAGGETTS POND 
Selectmen to acquire the necessary takings and slope easements by 

purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to appropriate the 
sum of $110,000.00 for the purpose of completing the construction of 
traffic signal installations designed for the intersections of Frontage 
Road at Dascomb Road and Lowell Street at Haggetts Pond Road, including 
any incidental roadway improvements needed in connection with such 
traffic signal installation and for other costs incidental and related 
thereto; that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow not exceeding $110,000 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 (14), of the General Laws, 
as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; and, further, that the 
Selectmen are authorized to acquire the necessary land and slope 
easements by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

The VOTE Yes 320 No 18 More than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 47 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by WATER MAINS - 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination MONTCLAIP. S 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $87,000.00 for the pur pose GOV. DR. 
of laying eight inch water mains in Montclair Avenue and Governors Drive. 
Betterments are to be assessed. 

Article 47 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 48 . To see if the Town will vote to approve the acceptance 

by the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School — — 

District of (1) Chapter 70A of the General Laws relating to an Equal,,,,, ., * cnunn l 
Educational Opportunity Grant. „_ ..,„ 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article ^8 
as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 49 . To see if the Town will vote to have the Massachusetts 

Electric Company install three (3) 175-watt sodium-vapor street lights 

on Lowell Street (Route 133) on existing poles located at the intersection 

of Evergreen Lane, at the intersection of Bellevue Road, and at a pole 

midway between the two, and to appropriate the sum of $375.00 +/- for 

the first year's operating costs. 

STREET LIGHTS - LOWELL STREET 

On petition of Fred J. Kulaga and others. 
Article 49 was WITHDRAWN. 



55 



52 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



JUNE 12, 1990 



ARTICLE 50 . To see if the Town of Andover will vote to raise and appro- 
ANDOVER ST. priate the sum of $100,000.00 for the construction of granite-curbed asphalt 
SIDEWALK sidewalks on the easterly and westerly sides of Andover Street, Ballardvale, 
from the Ballardvale Playground to Bannister Road; and to determine whether 
said sum shall be raised by taxation, by borrowing or by a combination of 
taxation and borrowing; or take any other action relating thereto. 

On petition of Richard J. Bowen and others. 

A report from the Andover Planning Board was made by Hooks Johnston. 

Article 50 was DEFEATED by a majority vote. 

Question was moved to appropriate sum of $100,000 from available funds 
which requires a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 51 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
CONSERVATION to ta ke by eminent domain for conservation purposes described in Chapter 40, 
ACQUISITION- Section 8C, Massachusetts General Laws the fee (or any lesser interest) in 
MAGEE tne following described parcels of land: 

Lots 22, 23, 6 24 of Assessors' Map 101; 5 acres, more or less, supposed to 
have been owned by Nova Corp., John Magee; located on the easterly side 
of Glenwood Road Extension. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Hooks Johnston. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 51 as printed in the Warrant. 

The VOTE UNANIMOUS More than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 



GLENWOOD RD. 
EXT. WATER 
EASEMENTS 



Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain, easements for the installation of water mains and 
appurtenances, approved and funded by Article 29 of the 1989 Town 
Meeting, on lots on Glenwood Road Extension. 

A report of the Planning Board was read by Carl Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 52 as printed in the Warrant. 



The VOTE UNANIMOUS 



More than 2/3 required. 



RESCINDING 
OF BOND 
AUTHORIZATIONS 



TOWN MTG. 
WARRANT 



ARTICLE 53 . To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond 
authorizations from prior Town Meetings or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a majority vote 
to rescind the following bond authorizations: 

Article 26 - 1985 Annual Town Meeting - Sewer/Lowell St. $ 65,000 
Article 29 - 1986 Annual Town Meeting - Old Town Hall 

Engineering/Design 150,000 
Article 18 - 1987 Annual Town Meeting - School Computers 325,000 

$540,000 

ARTICLE 54 . To see if the Town will vote to require that, henceforth, 
the Selectmen shall provide each voter of the Town of Andover with an 
official copy of the Warrant for any annual or special Town Meeting, 
to be used for the conduct of the business of such Town Meeting, and 
stating the time and place of holding the meeting and the subjects to 
be acted upon thereat, in compliance with Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 39, Section 10; such document to be devoid of editorial comment, 
recommendations and statements of approval or disapproval of any kind. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 54 was DEFEATED. 



56 



53 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

ARTICLE 55 . To authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent domain 

the fee in the street and way known as Nicoll Drive said ways being shown 

on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, MA, by Dana F. 

Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc." said plan recorded at the Essex North Registry of 

Deeds as Plan #8556, together with utility and drainage easement as shown 

on said plan and for the purpose of acquiring this street as a public way 

for the Town. NICOLL DR. EMINENT DOMAIN 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 55 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 56 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $450,000.00 for the purpose of laying eight inch 
or twelve inch water mains in Salem Street from Wethersfield Drive to Jenkins 
Road, Wagonwheel Road and Jenkins Road from Salem Street to the North Andover 
town line. Betterments are to be assessed. 

MAIN MAINS - SALEM ST. 
Article 56 was WITHDRAWN. 



6 JENKINS RD. 

ARTICLE 57 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
a sum not to exceed $3,000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, 
henceforth, all regular and special meetings of the Board of Selectmen of the 
Town of Andover shall be recorded officially in their entirety by means of a 
tape recorder or by other means of sonic reproduction, from the resulting 
recording of which copies and transcripts shall be made available to the public 
at no greater than actual cost. RECORDING OF 

SELECTMEN'S MTGS." 
On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 57 was DEFEATED. 

ARTICLE 58 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to acquire by purchase or gift or the Board of Selectmen to take 
by eminent domain for conservation purposes, to assure the quality of the 
Town's water supply, under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C, 
the fee or any lesser interest in all or part of the following described 
parcel of land located in the watershed of Fish Brook : C0NSCRVATI0N ACQUISITION 

HAARTZ 
Lot 4 of Assessors' Map 150, 1.85 acres, more or less; supposed 

to be owned by Haartz et al, Bessie B., Thomas B. and John H. 

Noyes; located on the southerly side of High Plain Road; 

said acquisition to be made by funds raised by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing; and to authorize 
and direct the Conservation Commission with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen on behalf of the Town to enter into any agreement that it deems 
advantageous with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11, for partial reimbursement of 
the costs of the acquisition of the above described land; or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Article 58 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 59 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate to the Conservation Fund the sum of $900,000 or any greater 
or lesser sum, for the acquisition of land for conservation purposes under 
the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C, of the Massachusetts General Laws; 
and to authorize the Town Manager and the Selectmen to petition the General 
Court for the passage of a special law authorizing the Town to issue notes 
in anticipation of any bonds or notes authorized for a term in excess of 
two years, or to take any other action relative thereto. 

A report from the Andover Planning Board was read by Carl Byers . 

CONSERVATION FUND APPROPRIATION 
Article 59 was DEFEATED. 

The VOTE Yes 229 No 128 More than 2/3 required. 



57 



54 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

ARTICLE 60 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Andover Code 

of By-Laws, Article XII, Miscellaneous By-Laws, by adding a new Section, 

Fire Alarm Systems /False Alarms, said Section to be numbered by the Town Clerk. 

FIRE ALARM 

BYLAW The following rules and regulations shall apply to the installation, 

operation, and maintenance of Fire Alarm systems: 

Approved by 1.0 SCOPE 

Atty. Gen. 

10/1/90 Fire alarm systems shall include systems connected to Fire Headquarters 

the Municipal Fire Alarm circuit, direct wire, and any systems which use 

by exterior audible signals at the alarm location. 

2.0 AUTHORITY 

Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 1U8, Section 26A-26H require the in- 
stallation of alarm systems in certain buildings and places responsibility 
for the enforcement of these provisions with the Fire Chief. This by-law 
is adopted to establish uniform rules and regulations and to implement a 
schedule of fees for the installation, operation, and maintenance of said 
alarm systems. 

3.0 ALARM SYSTEM INSTALLATION 

A. Any current or future alarm user may contract with an alarm company of 
their choice for the purchase, lease, installation, and servicing of an 
alarm system on their premises. 

B. No alarm system or equipment shall be connected to the Central Dispatch- 
ing Console without prior written approval of the Fire Chief. 

B.l This approval shall include municipal connection, direct wire and 
and dial up devices. 

C. The only types of systems which will be allowed to connect to Central 
Dispatch Console will be systems which utilize telephone dialer trans- 
mitters or connection via the Municipal Fire Alarm circuits, or such 
other type deemed compatible with the Central Dispatch Console. 

C.l Existing telephone dialers using voice-type tape recorders are 

allowed. Such alarm systems are to use the special alarm number 
set up only for this purpose. No equipment, as described in C.l, 
shall use the primary reporting telephone number. 

D. Actual connection to the Central Dispatch Console will be made by the 
Town's designated Alarm Contractor or Fire Alarm Division personnel. 
Alarm users will be required to pay the Alarm Contractor for this 
service as set forth in a contract between the Contractor and the 
Alarm user. 

E. The Town accepts no liability whatsoever for conditions which prevent 
proper reception of signals from the user's premises. 

t.O ALARM SYSTEM REGULATIONS 

A. Each alarm user shall submit to the Fire Chief the names, addresses, 
and telephone numbers of three (3) persons who can be reached at any 
time, day or night, who are authorized to gain entrance into the pro- 
tected premises for the purposes of silencing and resetting the alarm 
system. It shall be the alarm system user's responsibility to keep 
this information up to date. Each control panel shall have located 
inside its door the above information and also the name of the company 
and phone numbers of the company which currently services the system. 

Written instructions for resetting the control panel shall be clearly 
visible on the control panel. Permission to attempt a system reset 
must be on file with the Fire Department ' if user wishes the Fire 
Department to reset control unit. It shall be the alarm user's 
reponsibility to keep this information up to date. If after three 
(3) attempts a system will not reset the zone, or if necessary, the 
system, it will be left unrestored. In this event, attempts shall be 
made to contact the parties from the data given by the user. The Town 
assumes no liability for inability to contact listed persons. 



b5 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 



A.l In the event an alarm user's panel or zone or other protective 
system cannot be reset, or the contact person cannot respond to 
the premises within a short period of time, the Fire Department 
will send a fire alarm system detail to the building. The 
charges for this detail shall be billed to the building or 
complex owner who will remit payment to the Fire Department. 
A two-hour minimum will be charged for that service. 

A. 1.1 This regulation shall apply to all alarm systems; i.e., 
those connected to the Central Dispatch Console and 
those equipped with exterior audible signal devices. 

A. 1.2 Any building other than a residential building of less 

than six (6) units which has a fire alarm system or other 
fire protection system shall provide a secure key lock box 
installed in a location accessible to the Fire Department 
in case of an emergency. This key lock box shall contain 
keys to the fire alarm system control panel and any other 
keys necessary to operate or otherwise service the fire 
protection systems. The key lock box shall be of a type 
approved by the Fire Chief and shall be located and 
installed as instructed by the Fire Chief and/or the Fire 
Prevention Bureau personnel. 

A. 1.3 All premises shall have their legal street number clearly 
visible as per existing Town By-laws, prior to connection 
of the alarm systems to the Central Dispatch Console. 

B. All alarm users must notify the Central Dispatch Center in advance of 
any testing of equipment. Failure to do so may constitute a false 
alarm and therefore be subject to fee assessment. 

C. Any direct wire user who has multiple purpose alarms, i.e., fire or 
medical aid, or any combination thereof, must provide for individual 
alarm connections to the Central Dispatch Console as required. 

D.l Alarm systems which generate false alarms in any twelve (12) month 
period shall be subject to assessment as follows: 

(12 month period is a fiscal year July 1 to June 30) 
Fire Alarm Systems False Alarms 

Step 1 1 thru 3 None 

Step 2 4 thru 5 $200.00 each 

Step 3 6 or more $400.00 each 

4.0.D.2 DEFINITION OF FALSE ALARM 

The activation of an alarm system due to mechanical failure, malfunctioning 
equipment, improper installation, or negligence of the user of the alarm 
system, or his employees or agents. Excluded from this definition are 
activations of alarm systems caused by utility company power outages, 
communication receiving equipment problems at Central Dispatch, or other 
acts of nature beyond the control of the alarm user. 

False alarms shall include but not be limited to the following situations: 

(A) The continued activations of alarms resulting from any condition where 
no effective effort is made to correct the condition; 

(B) Detection devices reacting to a condition such as dirt, dust, or any 
other debris or material resulting from the failure of the owner to 
properly maintain and clean the system. 

The obligations of owners for the proper maintenance of their systems 
shall be set forth in 527 CMR 24.08, which is incorporated herein by 
reference. 

(C) Detection devices reacting to a condition such as smoke, steam, etc., 
where such occurrences are continuous with no corrective action taken. 

(E) Alarm users, who cannot produce a valid service agreement for the 
protected property shall pay an additional $50.00 per step. It is 
the intent of this section to have systems maintained on a regular 
basis annually. 

59 



56 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

E.l False alarms caused by faulty telephone service, electrical storms, 
or power outages will be excluded from assessments. 

E.l.l False alarms received during the first thirty (30) days of 
connection shall be discounted provided no malicious intent 
has occurred and every attempt has been made to rectify new 
installation defects. 

E.2 Determination that a false alarm has been transmitted will be the 
responsiblity of the Fire Chief or other duly appointed Fire 
Department Officer. 

E.2.1 Malicious false alarms shall be excluded provided the alarm 
system owner actively discourages these types of alarms 
through education and installation of deterrent devices 
applicably designed for these purposes, when requested by 
the Fire Chief. 

E.3 Payments of assessments will be billed by and paid to the Fire 
Department. 

E.U Upon failure of an alarm user to pay two (2) consecutive fees 

assessed within sixty (60) days of the assessment, the Fire Chief 
shall order the alarm user to discontinue the use of the alarm 
system for not more than six (6) months. Recovery of funds shall 
be through court proceedings. 

E.5 Town, County and State agencies are exempt from the provisions of 
the assessment schedule. 

5.0 VIOLATIONS 

A. The following acts and omissions shall constitute a violation of these 
regulations and shall be punishable as follows, by a fine of not less 
than $100.00 nor more than $200.00 per offense. 

A.l Failure to follow a written order issued by the Fire Chief to 
disconnect a fire alarm system from the municipal box, or to 
disable a telephone dialer arranged to dial the special alarm 
telephone number. 

A. 2 Failure to disconnect, after notification, an unauthorized tele- 
phone dialing device arranged to dial the Central Dispatch Console. 

A. 3 Failure to pay two (2) or more consecutive assessment fees assessed 
under Section 4, paragraph E of these regulations, within sixty (60) 
days from the date of the second assessment. 

A. 4 Failure to comply with the regulations set forth in Sections 3 and t 
of these regulations . 

A. 5 Continued transmission of false alarms caused by the user's negli- 
gence or system malfunctions on the user premises which is under 
the user's control, and where no effective effort is made to correct 
the condition. 

6 . APPEAL 

A. An alarm user wishing to appeal a decision of the Fire Chief pursuant to 
Section 4.0, paragraph E, of these regulations may within fifteen (15) 
calendar days of the fees assessment request in writing a hearing with 
the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to waive the reading of 
Article 60 and to approve Article 60 as printed in the Warrant and the 
Town Clerk be allowed to assign this proposed by-law its proper number. 

Article 60 passed by a MAJORITY VOTE. A quorum was present. 



60 



57 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

ARTICLE 61 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize tfie Board of 
Selectmen to enter into a contract, not to exceed 20 years, for the 
sale of water to North Reading, upon terms and conditions which it 
deems to be in the best interests of the Town. SALE OF WATER TO 

NORTH READING 

A motion was made and duly seconded to approve Article 61 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

A motion was made and duly seconded to amend Article 61 by striking 
the phrase "not to exceed 20 years" from the original motion and 
replacing it with the phrase "not to exceed five years". The motion 
was DEFEATED by a majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to close debate on 
Article 61 by a majority vote. 

It was VOTED to approve Article 61 as printed in the Warrant by a 
majority vote. 

ARTICLE 62 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $200,000 for architectural/ 
engineering fees associated with the preparation of Preliminary Plans 
and Designs for the construction and/or renovation of school buildings. 

Article 62 was WITHDRAWN. SCHOOL BLDG. PLANNING FUNDS 

ARTICLE 63 . To see if the Town will vote to abandon a part of Burtt Road 

as shown on plan of land in Andover entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, 

Mass. prepared for The Gillette Company, Scale 1" =40*, January 24, 1989, 

Dana F. Perkins 6 Associates, Inc.;" said plan to be recorded in Essex 

North District Registry of Deeds. 

ABANDONMENT OF A SECTION 



Article 63 was WITHDRAWN. 



OF BURTT ROAD 



ARTICLE 64 . To authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent 
domain the fee in the streets and ways known as Laconia Drive, Messinia 
Drive, Sparta Way, Doric Way, Odyssey Way and Acropolis Circle, said ways 
being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass., 
by Dana F. Perkins 6 Assoc, Inc." said plan recorded at the Essex North 
Registry of Deeds as Plan #8556, together with utility and drainage ease- 
ments as shown on said plan and for the purpose of acquiring these streets 
as public ways for the Town. EMINENT DOMAIN 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 64 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 65 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 

transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of 

the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $126,500.00 for the purpose 

of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with new granite 

curb on the northerly side of Shawsheen Road from the High School 

entrance to Lowell Street. SHAWSHEEN RD. SIDEWALK 

Article 65 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 66 . To see if the Town will vote to direct the Board of 
Selectmen, henceforth, to allow no governmental action which would 
be detrimental to the existence of the Town of Andover as a town. 

DIRECTION FOR BOARD 
On petition of John Doyle and others. OF SELECTMEN 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 
Article 66 as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 



61 



58 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



JUNE 12, 1990 



ARTICLE 67 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VI. I of the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw,» Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, to meet the new National Flood 

FLOOD HAZARD i nsura nce Program regulations as follows : 

DISTRICT 



Approved by 
Atty. Gen. 
10/1/90 



(1) By renumbering sections as follows: 

(a)* "VI. I. 1." to "VI. I. 2." 

(b) "VI. I. 2." to "VI. I. 3." 

(c) "VI. 1. 3." to "VI. m." 

(d) "VI. 1.4." to "VI. I. 5." 



(2) By adding a new Section VI. I. 1. as follows: 
"1. Purpose of District. 

The purposes of the Flood Hazard District are to: 

a. Ensure public safety through reducing the threats to life and 
personal injury. 

b. Eliminate new hazards to emergency response officials. 

c. Prevent the occurrence of public emergencies resulting from 
water quality, contamination and pollution due to flooding. 

d. Avoid the loss of utility services which if damaged by flooding 
would disrupt or shut down the utility network and impact regions 
of the community beyond the site of flooding. 

e. Eliminate costs associated with the response and cleanup of 
flooding conditions. 

f. Reduce damage to public and private property resulting from 
flooding waters." 

(3) By amending newly renumbered Section VI. I. 2 by striking the words "FIA 
Rate Map" and substituting therefor "Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) 
revised June 5, 1989". 

(4) By amending newly renumbered Section VI. I. 3. as follows: 

(a) By inserting the words "including structural and non-structural 
activities whether permitted by right or by special permit" after 
the word "District". 

(b) By replacing subsection c. with the following: 

"Within Zone A the most recent Federal, State, local or other 
floodway data shall be used to prohibit encroachments in floodways 
which would result in any increase in flood levels within the 
community during the occurrence of the base flood discharge. Within 
Zone AE, along watercourses that have not had a regulatory floodway 
designated, no new construction, substantial improvement, or other 
development shall be permitted unless it is demonstrated that the 
cumulative effect of the proposed development, when combined with 
all other existing and anticipated development, will not increase 
the water surface elevation of the base flood. Within Zone AE, 
along watercourses that have regulatory floodways designated. -on the 
Andover FIRM map, encroachments are prohibited in the regulatory 
floodway which would result in any increase in flood levels within 
the community during the occurrence of the base flood discharge. 

(c) By adding a new subsection d. to read as follows: 
"d. The requirements of 

- 780 CMR 744.0 of the Massachusetts State Building Code which 
address floodplain and coastal high hazard areas. 

- 310 CMR 10.00 Wetlands Protection, Department of Environmental 
Quality Engineering. 



62 



59 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

- 302 CMR 6.00, Inland Wetlands Restriction, DEQE. 

- 310 CMR 15, Title 5, minimum requirements for subsurface 
disposal of sanitary sewage, DEQE. 

as from time to time amended and if the particular CMR is then 
in force and effect as a Massachusetts regulation." 

(d) By adding a new subsection e. to read as follows: 

"e. Where any alteration or relocation or a water course is 
proposed, the appropriate federal, state and local 
authorities shall be notified including the National 
Flood Insurance Program State Coordinator and Program 
Specialist as well as representatives of adjacent 
communities if appropriate." 

A report from the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously to waive 
the reading of Article 67 and that Article 67 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS. More than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 68 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum not to exceed $20,000 to re-establish and make usable again the 

full width of the legal roadway of Oak Street as originally established 

and on record with the Town of Andover, an average of 38 feet in width 

(6 ft. each sidewalk 6 26 ft. roadway) for a distance of 690 feet more OAK ST. 

or less. To survey and set appropriate permanent boundary markers in 

order to accurately accomplish this task. 

Said sum to be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and further to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or by 
seizure by right of eminent domain such land as may be required to 
re-store the roadway/sidewalks of. 

On petition of Richard H. St. Amand and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was made by Hooks Johnston. 

Motion From Floor: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum not to exceed $20,000 from available funds to make 
usable again the full width of Oak Street as originally established 
and on record with the Town of Andover, an average of 38 feet in width 
(6 ft. each sidewalk and 26 ft. roadway) for a distance of 690. feet 
more or less. To set appropriate permanent boundary markers in order 
to accomplish this task. 

Article 68 was DEFEATED. 

ARTICLE 69 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, Section 22 
of the General By-Laws, Storage of Inflammables, by deleting the fee 
schedule in its entirety and substituting the following: 

License Fee - . . . . $60.00 

FEES FOR STORAGE 
Annual certificate of registration fee: OF INFLAMMABLES 

1 to 999 gallons 10.00 

1,000 to 14,999 gallons 20.00 Approved by 

15,000 gallons and up 30.00 Atty. Gen. 

10/1/90 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to waive the reading 

of Article 69 and approve Article 69 as printed in the Warrant by a 

majority vote. 

Article 69 was PASSED by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 



63 



"^ ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

ARTICLE 70 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
WATER METERS of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $1,500,000 
for the purchase and installation of water meters and related 
remote reading equipment; to authorize the application for and 
acceptance of State or other grants therefor; and further to 
authorize the Town Manager and the Selectmen to petition the 
General Court for the passage of a special law authorizing the 
Town to issue notes in anticipation of any bonds or notes 
authorized hereunder for a term in excess of two years, or 
to take any other action relative to the foregoing matters. 

Article 70 was WITHDRAWN. 



POLE HILL PR 

EMINENT 

DOMAIN 



ARTICLE 71 . To authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent 
domain the fee in the street and way known as Pole Hill Drive, said 
'-way being shown on a plan entitled, "Definitive Plan of Waterford 
Place, Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass., of Pole Hill 
Drive, Scale 1" = 40*, dated April 7, 1982, Owner T. D. J. Develop- 
ment Corporation, Engineers Dana F. Perkins and Associates, Inc.", 
said plan being recorded with the Essex North Registry of Deeds as 
Plan No. 8906, together with utility and drainage easement as shown 
on said plan and for the purpose of acquiring said street as a public 
way for the Town. 

On petition of Peginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 71 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 72 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager to release to all departments, including the School 
QUARTERLY Department, quarterly appropriations to cover expenses and, 
APPROPRIA- further, to request Home Rule Legislation from the Commonwealth of 
TIONS Massachusetts authorizing such practice, should such legislation be 

required; or take any other action relative to the foregoing matters. 

Article 72 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 73 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VI. Q. of 
the Andover Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) By striking the words "Applicability : No" in subsection 2. 
STTr p thereof and substituting therefor the following: "SITE PLAN 

REVIEW CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL : Except as provided in newly 
renumbered section VI. Q. 3. below", and 



REVIEW 



(2) By deleting the words "VI.Q.2.a., above" in section VI.Q.2.b. 

Approved by and substituting therefor "this section VI. Q. 2", and 
Atty. Gen. 

10/1/90 (3) By renumbering sections as follows: 

a. "VI. Q. 3." to "VI. Q. 4" 

b. "VI. Q. 4." to "VI. Q. 5", and 

(4) By adding a new section to be known as Section VI. Q. 3. to read 
as follows : 

"3. SITE PLAN SPECIAL PERMIT: The Planning Board may grant a Site 
Plan Special Permit in accordance with the standards of the 
Zoning Bylaw. A Site Plan Special Permit shall be required for 
new construction and for the enlargement or renovation of an 
existing building, in which commercial, industrial and/or 
institutional use or uses are allowed as of right, under 
Section IV. B., Table of Use Regulations: 

a. Where the gross floor area of an existing building is 
increased 2,000 square feet or more; 

b. Where the gross floor area of a proposed building or 
of all buildings proposed exceeds 10,000 square feet; 

c. Where more than 40% of the gross floor area of an existing 
building is being altered, renovated, reconstructed or re- 
developed. The Planning Board may waive the Special Permit 
requirement under this subsection c if in its judgment the 
use and occupancy following the alteration, renovation, 
reconstruction or redevelopment is not substantially 
different from the prior use and occupancy.", and 

64 



61 
ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

(5) By amending newly renumbered Section VI. Q. 4. as follows: 

(a) By inserting the words "for Site Plan Review Certificate of 
Approval and for a Site Plan Special Permit" after the word 
"materials", and 

(b) By adding a new subsection 17 to read as follows: 

"17. For Site Plan Special Permit only, elevation of 
building exterior", and 

(6) By amending the new renumbered Section VI. Q. 5. by inserting the 
words "for Site Plan Review Certificate of Approval" after the 
word "Procedure", and 

(7) By amending Section VI. Q. by inserting a new subsection 6 to read 
as follows : 

"6. Procedure for Site Plan Special Permit: 

a. Sections VI.Q.5.a. and b. shall apply. 

b. The Planning Board may require the applicant to submit more 
information about the proposed development within the purposes 
and guidelines of this Section VI. Q. or based on comments of 
the reviewing boards and agencies. Additional information 
shall be submitted to the Planning Board within ten (10) 

days of written request therefor by the Board. 

c. In reviewing the application, the Planning Board shall, as 
a minimum, consider staff comments and items 1-9 of Section 
VI.Q.5.C. 

d. The Special Permit criteria of Section VIII. C. of the Zoning 
Bylaw shall be met." 

(8) By amending Section VIII. C. 2. a. by adding a new subsection (6) to read 
as follows : 

"(6) Site Plan Special Permit, under Section VI. Q. of this Bylaw." 

A report from the Andover Planning Board was made by Susan Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to waive the reading 
of Article 73 and that Article 73 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS. More than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 74 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XI, Section 6 
of the Town of Andover Code of By-laws, by deleting the section in its 
entirety and substituting the following: 

Section 6. Town Clerk's fees. TOWN CLERK'S FEES 

(1) For filing and indexing assignment for the 

benefit of creditors $10.00 ADDroved 

, , by Atty. 

(2) For correcting errors m a record of birth 10.00 ^ 

, k 10/1/90 

(3) For furnishing a certificate of birth 5.00 

(4) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of birth . . 4.00 

(5) For entering delayed record of birth 10.00 

(6) For filing certificate of a person conducting business 

under any title other than his real name 20.00 

(7) For the filing by a person conducting business under 
any title other than his real name of a statement of 
change of his residence, or of his discontinuance, 
retirement or withdrawal from, or a change of location 

of such business 10.00 



65 



62 ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 



(8) For furnishing certified copy of certificate of person 
conducting business under any title other than his real 
name, or a statement by such person of his discontinuance, 
retirement or withdrawal from such business 5.00 

(9) For ecording the name and address, the date and number 
of the certificate issued to a person registered for the 
practice of podiatry in the Commonwealth 20.00 

(10) For correcting errors in a record of death 10.00 

(11) For furnishing a death certificate 5.00 

(12) For issuing and recording licenses to junk collectors . 50.00 

(13) For issuing and recording licenses to keepers of 
billiard saloons, pool or sippio rooms or tables, 
bowling alley, etc.: 

First table or alley 30.00 

Each additional table or alley 15.00 

(lu) For entering notice of intention of marriage and issuing 

certificate thereof 15.00 

(15) For entering marriage certificate filed by persons 

married outside the Commonwealth 5.00 

(16) For issuing certificate of marriage 5.00 

(17) For correcting errors in a record of marriage 10.00 

(18) For recording certificate of registration granted to a 
person to engage in the practice of optometry or issuing 

a certified copy thereof 20.00 

(19) For recording the name of the owner of a certificate of 
registration as a physician or osteopath in the 
Commonwealth 20.00 

(20) For recording order granting locations of poles, piers, 
abutments or conduits, alterations or transfers thereof, 
and increase in number of wires and cable or attachments 
under the provisions of Section 22 of Chapter 166: 

Each petition 40.00 

Each additional street or way 10.00 

(21) For examining records or papers relating to birth, 
marriage or deaths upon the application of any person, 

the actual expense thereof, but not less than 5.00 

(22) For copying any manuscript or record pertaining to a 

birth, marriage or death, per page 5.00 

(23) For receiving and filing of a complete inventory of 
all items to be included in a "closing out sale", etc.: 

First page 10.00 

Each additional page 2.00 

(24) For fi-ling a copy of written statement or declaration of 
trust by the trustees of an association or trust, or any 
amendment thereof as provided in Section 2, Chapter 182 20.00 

(25) Voter's card 5.00 

(26) Recording any other documents: 

First page 10.00 

Each additional page 2.00 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to waive the reading 
of Article 74 and approve Article 74 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 74 was passed by a MAJORITY VOTE. A quorum was present. 

66 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 



63 



ARTICLE 75 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of TRAFFIC 
the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $270,000, or any greater or SIGNALS - 
lesser sum, for the design and installation of a traffic signal at HAVERHILL/ 
High Street and Haverhill Street and for costs incidental and related HIGH STS. 
thereto, including the acquisition of any easements required in 
connection therewith; and to authorize the Town to accept any Federal 
or State grants to reduce the cost thereof. 

A report from the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to appropriate the 
sum of $27,000 for the Town's share of the cost of a project estimated 
to cost a total of $270,000.00 for the design and installation of a 
traffic signal at High Street and Haverhill Street, and for costs inci- 
dental and related thereto, including the acquisition of any easements 
required in connection therewith, such appropriation to be raised by 
transfer from available funds, and that the Town Manager or the Selectmen 
be hereby authorized to apply for and accept any Federal or State grants 
that may be available to defray the balance of the cost of said project. 

Article 75 PASSED by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 76 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by PLANNING FUNDS - 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of PUBLIC 
the foregoing and appropriate $150,000 for architectural/engineering SAFETY 
fees associated with the preparation of preliminary plans and designs CENTER 6 
for the construction, renovations and/or additions to the Public Safety TOWN YARD 
Center and Town Yard. 

Article 76 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 77 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Andover 
Code of By-Laws, Article XII, Miscellaneous By-Laws, by adding a new 
Section, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings and Structures, 

said Section to be numbered by the Town Clerk, to read as follows: HISTORIC 

DISTRICT 



1. Intent and Purpose : This bylaw is adopted for the purpose of protect- DEM0- 
ing and preserving historically significant buildings and structures, as LI- 
defined in Section 2.F. below, which constitute or reflect distinctive TION 
features of the history of the Town of Andover, and for the purpose of BYLAW 
promoting the public welfare through the preservation of the architec- 
tural, historical, cultural and aesthetic qualities of the Town. Appr. by 
Through this bylaw the Town desires to encourage owners, and others, Atty. Gen. 
to preserve, rehabilitate, or restore such historically significant 10/1/90 
buildings or structures rather than demolishing or removing them. w/Section 6 

par. 1 strik. 
It is not intended that this bylaw cover customary and usual alterations, & del. 
whether major or minor, to historically significant buildings and 
structures, provided that the character and effect of such alterations 
is not, in the opinion of the Inspector, tantamount to demolition of 
such a building or structure in contravention of the above intent and 
purpose . 

2. Def ini tions : For the purposes of this bylaw, the following words and 
phrases shall have the following meanings : 

A. Building : A free-standing structure designed for the shelter or 
housing of persons, animals, chattels or property of any kind. 

B. Commission : The Andover Historical Commission. 

C. Days : For the purposes of this bylaw, "days" shall mean calendar 
days. 

D. Demolition : Any act of pulling down, destroying, altering signifi- 
cantly, or razing a structure, or any attached portion thereof. 

E. Demolition Permit : The permit issued by the Building Inspector as 
required by the State Building Code for the demolition, partial 
demolition or removal of a building or structure from its lot, or 
the moving of the building or structure on its lot. 



67 



64 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

F. Historically Significant Building or Structure : Any building or 
structure which is (1) associated with any one or more historic 
persons or events or with the architectural, cultural, economic, 
political or social history of the Town of Andover, the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, and/or The United States of America; or (2) is 
historically or architecturally important by reason of type, period, 
style and method of building construction, or represents the work 

of a well-known architect or builder, either by itself or in the 
context of a group of buildings or structures. 

G. Inspector : Andover Inspector of Buildings. 

H. "Preferably Preserved" Historically Significant Building or 

Structure : Any historically significant building or structure 
which is established after a public hearing by the Commission 
to be worthy of preservation. 

I. Removal : To transfer a structure from its existing location. 

J. Structure : Any combination of materials assembled, constructed, 
erected or maintained at a fixed location and place permanently 
or temporarily in or on the ground. 

3. Regulated Buildings and Structures : The provisions of this bylaw shall 
apply only to the following buildings and structures: 

A. Any building or structure listed on, or which is the subject of 
a pending application for inclusion on, the National Register of 
Historic Places or the Massachusetts State Register of Historic 
Places; or 

B. Any building or structure located within 200 feet of the boundary 
line of any Federal, State or Local Historic District; or 

C. Any building or structure included in the Inventory of the Historic 
and Prehistoric Assets of the Commonwealth maintained by the 
Commission or which is designated by the Commission for inclusion 
in said Inventory. 

D. However, the provisions of this bylaw shall not apply to any 
building or structure located in a local Historical District and 
subject to regulation under the provisions of General Laws Chapter UOC. 

4. Procedure : 

A. Application : Within ten days of the filing of such application, the 
Inspector or his assistant shall forward a copy of each demolition 
permit application for a building or structure identified in Section 3, 
above, to the Commission. 

B. Historically Significant Determination : Within 40 days from the 
Commission's receipt of a demolition permit application, the 
Commission shall hold an open meeting to hear and collect information 
and evidence to determine whether or not the building or structure is 
historically significant. The applicant for the permit shall be 
notified in writing at least 7 days prior to the open meeting. 

The 40 day period may be extended by written agreement signed by 
the applicant and a member of the Commission. 

1) If the Commission determines that based upon available information 
and evidence, the building or structure is not historically sign- 
ficant, the Commission shall forthwith notify the Inspector in 
writing of its decision, including the reasons for such a deter- 
mination, and the Inspector may issue a demolition permit. 

2) If the Commission determines that based upon available information 
and evidence the building or structure _is_ historically significant, 
the Commission shall notify the Inspector in writing of its 
decision, including the reason for such a determination, and notify 
the Inspector to inform the applicant that a historically signifi- 
cant building or structure demolition/removal plan review must be 
made prior to the issuance of a demolition permit. 



68 



65 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 



C. Historically Significant Building or Structure Demolition/Removal 
Plan Review : 

1) Within 30 days after the Commission's determination that a 
building or structure is historically significant, the applicant 
for the demolition permit shall submit to the Commission 6 copies 
of a demolition/removal plan that includes the following informa- 
tion: 

a. A map showing the present location of the building or 
structure to be demolished/removed on its property with 
references to lot lines and neighboring buildings; 

b. Three inch by five inch (3" x 5") photographs of all sides 
of the building or structure; and, 

c. A brief description identifying the reasons for the pro- 
posed demolition/removal, including any data to justify 
the need for demolition/removal and the proposed reuse of 
the parcel on which proposed demolition is located. 

2) Within 50 days from its receipt of the demolition/removal plan, 
the Commission shall hold a public hearing with respect to the 
demolition/removal application and plan. With the assistance of 
the Department of Community Development and Planning, notice of 
the public hearing shall be advertised in a newspaper of local 
circulation at least 7 days prior to the public hearing. The 
applicant, the Planning Board, and all immediate abutters of the 
property where the building or structure is to be demolished/ 
removed shall be notified in writing of the public hearing by 
mailing or delivering notice thereof to them at least 7 days 
prior to the date of the public hearing. 

D. Decision: 



1) Within 60 days from the Commission's receipt of the demolition/ 
removal plan, but no later than 21 days after the public hearing, 
the Commission shall make a written decision stating its reasons 
for such a determination, including a specific statement as to 
whether or not the building or structure should be preferably 
preserved because of its historical significance. 

2) If the building or structure is determined by the Commission not 
to be preferably preserved or if the Commission fails to file its 
written decision with the Inspector within 65 days from its receipt 
of the demolition/removal plan, then the Inspector may issue a 
demolition permit. 

3) If the building or structure is determined to be preferably 
preserved, then the Inspector shall not issue a demolition permit 
for a period of 6 months from the date the Commission determined 
that the building was "historically significant", unless the 
Commission informs the Inspector prior to the expiration of the 

6 month period that: 

A. In the opinion of the Commission there is no likelihood of 
preserving, restoring or rehabilitating the building; or 

B. The Commission is satisfied that the applicant for the 
demolition permit has made a bona fide, reasonable and 
unsuccessful effort to locate a purchaser for the building 

or structure who is willing to preserve, rehabilitate or 
restore the building or structure; or 

C. The applicant for the demolition permit has agreed to 
accept a demolition permit according to certain conditions 
approved by the Commission. 



69 



66 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



JUNE 12, 1990 



5. Emergency Demolition : If a building or structure poses an immediate 
threat to public health or safety due to its deteriorated condition, 
the owner of such building or structure may request issuance of an 
emergency demolition permit from the Inspector. As soon as practicable 
after the receipt of such request from the owner, the Inspector shall 
arrange to have the property inspected by himself or his designee, and 
the Chairman of the Commission or his designee. After inspection of 
the building or structure and consultation with the Fire Chief and/or 
the Board of Public Health and the Commission Chairman or his designee, 
the Inspector shall determine whether the condition of the building or 
structure represents a serious and imminent threat to public health 
and safety, and whether there is any reasonable alternative to the 
immediate demolition of the building or structure which would protect 
public health and safety. Whenever the Inspector issues an emergency 
demolition permit under the provisions of this bylaw section, he shall 
prepare and file a written report describing the condition of the 
building or structure, and the basis of his decision to issue an 
emergency demolition permit, with the Commission. Nothing in this 
bylaw shall be inconsistent with the procedures for the demolition 
and/or securing of buildings and structures established by General 
Laws Chapter 143, Sections 6 - 10, as long as the Commission Chairman 
is invited to accompany the Inspector in any related inspections. 

6. Non-Compliance : Anyone who demolishes/removes a building or structure 
identified in Section Three (3) without first obtaining, and complying 
fully with, the provisions of a demolition permit in accordance with 
the provisions of this bylaw shall be subject to a fine of not more 
than $500.00. 

Notwithstanding that an assessed fine is paid, unless a demolition permit 
was obtained for such demolition/removal and unless such permit was fully 
complied with, the Inspector shall not issue a building permit pertaining 
to any property on which a building or structure identified in Section (3) 
has been demolished for a period of two (2) years from the date of demo- 
lition, unless the Commission recommends to him, after an open meeting, 
that this further penalty be waived. 

7. Severabili ty : In case any section, paragraph, or part of this bylaw is 
declared invalid or unconstitutional by any court of competent juris- 
diction, every other section, paragraph and part of the bylaw shall 
continue in full force and effect. 

Inserted at the request of the Historical Commission. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to waive the reading of 
Article 77 and approve Article 77 as printed in the Warrant and the Town 
Clerk be allowed to assign this proposed bylaw its proper number. 

Article 77 PASSED by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 



DOG BYLAW 

AMENDMENT 



Appr. by 
Atty. Gen 
10/1/90 
words in 
subsec . ( k ) 
"and one hundred 
dollars ($100.) 



ARTICLE 78 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Andover Code 
of By-Laws, Article XII, Section 11, Dogs, as follows: 

By striking out the following subsections (a) Definitions : Restraint ; 
( c ) Restraint of dogs ; ( e ) Reclaiming impounded dogs ; ( g ) Nuisances ; ( h ) 
Quarantining of dog that bites ; (k) By-law violation ; and (n) Fees in their 
entirety, and substituting therefor the following: 



(a) Definitions: 



Restraint: 



A dog shall be deemed to be under restraint if it is on 
the premises of the owner accompanied by a person who shall have the 



the dog under control or, if outside the premises of the owner, is 
for a fourth are accompanied by a person who shall have the dog under control by 
striken & del. holding it firmly on a leash no greater than six (6) feet in length. 



(c) Restraint of Dogs : No person shall own, keep or harbor in the Town 
of Andover, within the confines of the owner's property (meaning 
owned, rented or leased), any dog which is left unattended and is 
not kenneled, leashed or otherwise restrained or, if outside the 
premises of the owner (meaning owned, rented or leased) any dog 
which is not held firmly on a leash no greater than six (6) feet in 
length by a person who shall have control of such a dog. 



70 



67 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING JUNE 12, 1990 

(e) Reclaiming impounded dogs : An owner reclaiming an impounded dog 
shall pay an administrative fee of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) 
plus seven dollar ($7.00) boarding charge for each day that the 
dog has been impounded, to a total maximum of ninety-five dollars 
($95.00). 

(g) Nuisances : No owner shall fail to exercise proper care and control 

of his or her dog to prevent said dog from becoming a public nuisance. 
Barking frequently or for continued duration, or making sounds which 
create a noise disturbance across a residential real property boundary, 
molesting passersby, chasing vehicles, habitually attacking people or 
other domestic animals, trespassing upon school grounds, or trespassing 
upon private property in such manner as to damage property shall be 
deemed a nuisance. 

(h) Quarantining of dog that bites : Any dog that bites a person shall be 
quarantined for ten (10) day3 if ordered by the Inspector of Animals. 
During quarantine, the dog shall be securely confined and kept from 
contact with any other animal. At the discretion of Inspector of 
Animals, the quarantine may be on the premises of the owner. If the 
Inspector of Animals requires other confinement, the owner shall 
surrender the animal for the quarantine period to an animal shelter 
or shall at his own expense place it in a veterinary hospital. If 
said dog is in violation of one or more of the following: unlicensed, 
unrestrained, or is not currently vaccinated with antirabies vaccine, 
the owner shall surrender the animal for the quarantine period to a 
veterinary hospital at the owner's expense. 

(k) By-law violation : Proceedings under this section shall not be 
criminal. Violations of any provision of this By-Law shall be 
punished by a fine of fifteen dollars ($15.00) for the first, 
twenty-five dollars ($25.00) for a second, fifty dollars ($50.00) 
for a third, and one hundred dollars ($100.00) for a fourth or 
subsequent offense. If any violation be continuing, each day's 
violation shall be deemed to be a separate violation. Complaints 
will be sought in a District Court according to Chapter l<+0, 
Section 173A of the General Laws. 

(n) Fees : 

(1) The fees for dog licenses shall be as follows: Four dollars ($4.00) 
for a male dog and six dollars ($6.00) for a female dog unless the 
female dog has been spayed, in which case the fee shall be four 
dollars ($4.00). Any dog licensed after May 1 shall be subject to 
an administration fee of $2.00 per month or any part thereof. Said 
fees are subject to all other conditions as set forth in MGLA, 
Chapter 140, Section 139. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to waive the reading of 
Article 78 and approve Article 78 as printed in the Warrant by a majority 
vote. 

The Vote Yes 225 No 101 A quorum was present. 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED 
to dissolve the 1990 Annual Town Meeting at 11:00 P.M. 

ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



71 



68 



STATE PRIHARY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1990 

WARRANT 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ESSEX, SS 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Andover: 
Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of the 3aid town who are qualified to vote in PRIMARIES to vote 
at 

PRECINCTS 1, 3, and 8 

at the Senior Citizen Center, Town Offices, Whittier Court 

AND 

PRECINCTS 2, U, 5, 6, and 7 
at the Dunn Gymnaisium - Off Shawsheen Road 

on TUESDAY, THE EIGHTEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1990 from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 
for the following purposes: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political 
parties for the following offices: 



U. S. SENATOR 

GOVERNOR 

LT. GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

AUDITOR 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
COUNTY TREASURER 
COUNTY COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 

SECOND ESSEX 6 MIDDLESEX 

SENATORIAL DISTRICT 
SEVENTEENTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 
EASTERN DISTRICT 
ESSEX COUNTY 
ESSEX COUNTY 
ESSEX COUNTY 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon 
at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-fourth day of August, 1990. 



James M. Bar^nboim 
William T. Down3 
Gail L. Ralston 
Gerald H. Silverman 
Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 



SELECTMEN 

OF 

ANDOVER 



John F. Manning, Constable 
Andover, Augu3t 24, 1990 

Essex, S3 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of the Constables 
of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 3ald Town, to meet at 
the time and place and for the purposes 3tated in 3aid warrant, by posting a 
true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each Schoolhou3e, and 
in no less than five other public places where bill3 and notices are usually 
posted. Said warrants have been posted at least seven days. 

John F. Manning, Constable 



72 



69 



STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1990 











REPUBLICAN 


PARTY 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


U. S. SENATOR 
Daniel W. Daly 




133 


133 


136 


105 


148 


111 


124 


152 


1042 


277 


322 


334 


364 


330 


295 


366 


381 


Jim Rappaport 


2669 


60 


43 


40 


34 


51 


48 


63 


61 


Blanks 
GOVERNOR 


400 


147 


174 


141 


172 


179 


134 


149 


195 


Steven D. Pierce 


1291 


317 


320 


364 


325 


348 


313 


400 


392 


William F. Weld 


2779 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


John Silber 


2 


6 


4 


5 


6 


2 


7 


2 


7 


Blanks 

LT. GOVERNOR 


39 


253 


262 


293 


273 


279 


240 


306 


322 


A. Paul Cellucci 


2228 


157 


189 


162 


190 


194 


168 


186 


211 


Peter G. Torkildsen 


1457 


60 


47 


55 


40 


56 


46 


61 


61 


Blanks 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 


426 


170 


179 


180 


194 


228 


169 


191 


221 


Guy A. Carbone 


1532 


228 


256 


257 


239 


229 


212 


270 


296 


William C. Sawyer 


1987 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


James Shannon 


2 


72 


63 


73 


70 


72 


73 


90 


77 


Blanks 

SECRETARY OF STATE 


590 


340 


344 


335 


385 


314 


331 


385 


388 


Paul McCarthy 


2822 


130 


154 


175 


118 


215 


123 


168 


206 


Blanks 
TREASURER 


1289 


369 


384 


362 


422 


343 


362 


423 


436 


Joseph D. Malone 


3101 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


George Keverian 


2 


101 


114 


148 


81 


186 


92 


128 


158 


Blanks 
AUDITOR 


1008 


324 


317 


323 


372 


296 


318 


361 


372 


Douglas J. Murray 


2683 


146 


181 


187 


131 


233 


136 


192 


222 


Blanks 


1428 


















REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 


257 


278 


256 


303 


306 


273 


331 


324 


Donal T. Coleman 


2328 


142 


118 


134 


131 


78 


116 


119 


129 


John F. MacGovern 


967 


71 


102 


120 


69 


145 


65 


103 


141 


Blanks 
COUNCILLOR 


816 


330 


344 


331 


386 


309 


322 


373 


380 


John P. Harris 


2775 


140 


154 


179 


117 


220 


132 


180 


214 


Blanks 


1336 



73 



70 



STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1990 











REPUBLICAN 


PARTY 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COU 
Alba N. Castillo 


RT 


32«» 


340 


328 


381 


309 


332 


374 


387 


2775 


146 


158 


182 


122 


220 


122 


179 


207 


Blanks 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GEN. 


1336 

COURT 


240 


265 


215 


264 


240 


190 


257 


325 


Gary H. Coon 


1996 


185 


191 


254 


188 


204 


212 


234 


212 


Robert Manning 


1680 


45 


"♦2 


41 


51 


85 


52 


62 


57 


Blanks 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 


435 


























No Nomination 





470 


498 


510 


503 


529 


454 


553 


594 


Blanks 

REGISTER OF PROBATE 


4111 


344 


357 


362 


364 


322 


318 


381 


424 


Everett C. Hudson 


2872 


126 


141 


148 


139 


207 


136 


172 


170 


Blanks 

COUNTY TREASURER 


1239 


329 


34 S 


360 


351 


315 


307 


368 


416 


George K. Mazareas 


2791 


141 


153 


150 


152 


214 


147 


185 


178 


Blanks 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 


1320 


340 


364 


375 


370 


329 


315 


384 


423 


Kevin J. Leach 


2900 


130 


134 


135 


133 


200 


139 


169 


171 


Blanks 


1211 



^ 



74 



71 



STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1990 















DEMOCRATIC PARTY 








l 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


U.S. SENATOR 
John F. Kerry 






U26 


511 


505 


482 


444 


472 


495 


476 


3811 


^ 


177 


190 


214 


253 


229 


269 


215 


217 


Blanks 
GOVERNOR 


1764 


! 


230 


254 


200 


211 


197 


224 


238 


227 


Francis X. Bellotti 


1841 


i 


18 


22 


17 


14 


16 


16 


22 


19 


Evelyn F. Murphy 


144 




341 


403 


418 


495 


443 


490 


439 


426 


John Silber 


3455 




14 


22 


24 


15 


17 


11 


11 


21 


Blanks 


135 


L 


















LT. GOVERNOR 






250 


276 


298 


288 


234 


299 


275 


294 


Mar jorie Clapprood 


2214 




17<* 


201 


190 


191 


169 


189 


176 


153 


William B. Golden 


1443 




108 


134 


147 


164 


199 


178 


170 


158 


N. A. Paleologos 


1258 




71 


90 


84 


92 


71 


75 


89 


88 


Blanks 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 


660 




350 


380 


390 


355 


317 


325 


345 


318 


Jame3 M. Shannon 


2780 




231 


293 


302 


359 


336 


386 


347 


355 


Scott Har3hbarger 


2609 


i 


22 


28 


27 


21 


20 


30 


18 


20 


Blanks 


186 


u 


















SECRETARY OF STATE 






388 


432 


423 


445 


348 


431 


404 


389 


Michael J. Connolly 


3260 




215 


269 


296 


290 


325 


310 


306 


304 


Blanks 
TREASURER 


2315 




262 


310 


292 


329 


253 


340 


273 


300 


William F. Galvin 


2359 




158 


175 


198 


189 


149 


179 


169 


161 


George Keverian 


1378 




110 


105 


120 


134 


126 


128 


160 


115 


Dick Kraus 


998 




73 


111 


109 


83 


145 


94 


108 


117 


Blanks 


840 


v^ 


















AUDITOR 






375 


404 


379 


412 


340 


421 


390 


366 


A. Joseph DeNucci 


3087 




228 


297 


340 


323 


333 


320 


320 


327 


Blanks 


2488 




















REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 


| 


427 


443 


460 


476 


357 


454 


448 


421 


Chester G. Atkins 


3486 


























176 


258 


259 


259 


316 


287 


262 


272 


Blanks 


2089 



^_ 



75 



72 









ST 


ME PR 


IHARY, SE 


PTEMBER 


18, 1990 














DEMOCRATIC PARTY 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


COUNCILLOR 
John F. Mar key 




386 


411 


421 


474 


357 


452 


414 


369 


3284 


101 


125 


117 


137 


128 


141 


149 


139 


Vincent A. Raponi 


1037 


116 


165 


181 


124 


188 


148 


147 


185 


Blanks 


1254 


















SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 


423 


467 


480 


458 


408 


437 


450 


430 


Patricia McGovern 


3553 


ieo 


234 


239 


277 


265 


304 


260 


263 


Blanks 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GEN. 


2022 
COURT 


383 


391 


423 


368 


339 


354 


412 


408 


Susan C. Tucker 


3078 


201 


276 


261 


328 


299 


362 


273 


255 


John J. Desmond, Jr. 


2255 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


' - 


- 


- 


Neil Onerhein 


1 


19 


34 


35 


39 


35 


25 


25 


30 


Blanks 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 


241 


412 


455 


448 


457 


377 


427 


414 


426 


Kevin M. Burke 


3416 


191 


246 


271 


278 


296 


314 


296 


267 


Blanks 

REGISTER OF PROBATE 


2159 


249 


285 


299 


315 


269 


307 


289 


252 


Peter M. Blanchette 


2265 


43 


61 


58 


61 


54 


61 


76 


62 


Carmen J. Ciaropa 


476 


88 


107 


98 


101 


78 


106 


91 


112 


James F. X. Doherty 


781 


60 


78 


72 


87 


83 


80 


63 


67 


Patrick J. McManus 


590 


163 


170 


192 


171 


189 


187 


191 


200 


Blanks 

COUNTY TREASURER 


1463 


369 


399 


382 


430 


313 


390 


387 


353 


Katherine 0'Leary 


3023 


234 


302 


337 


305 


360 


351 


323 


340 


Blanks 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 


2552 


202 


231 


207 


231 


148 


220 


216 


177 


Charles T. Arena 


1632 


218 


229 


243 


284 


246 


288 


259 


253 


Christie Ciampa, Jr. 


2020 


183 


241 


269 


220 


279 


233 


235 


263 


Blanks 


1923 



u 



76 



73 



^ 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 1990 
WARRANT 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MICHAEL J. CONNOLLY, SECRETARY 

Essex, 35 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Andover 



^ 



u 



GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in ELECTIONS to vote at 

PRECINCTS 1, 3, and 8 
at the Senior Citizen Center, Town Offices, Whittier Court 

AND 

PRECINCTS 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 
at the Dunn Gymnaisiura - Off Shawsheen Road 

on TUESDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1990 from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the 
following purposes: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of political parties 
for the following offices: 



U. S. SENATOR 

GOVERNOR AND LT. GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

AUDITOR 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
COUNTY TREASURER 
COUNTY COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 

SECOND ESSEX 6 MIDDLESEX 

SENATORIAL DISTRICT 
SEVENTEENTH ESSEX REPRESENTATIVE 

DISTRICT 
EASTERN DISTRICT 
ESSEX COUNTY 
ESSEX COUNTY 
ESSEX COUNTY 



V^ 



QUESTIONS 

#1. Abolishing the State Census 

#2. Restricting U3e of state consultants 

#3. Changing laws concerning state taxes and fee3 

#4. Changing requirements for political parties and candidates 

#5. Allocating state aid to cities and towns 

#6. Free and equal broadcast time for candidates 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at 
the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 24th day of October, 1990. 



James M. Barenboim ! 




William T. Downs 


1 SELECTMEN 


Gail L. Ralston ' 


1 OF 


Gerald H. Silverman 


1 ANDOVER 


Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 





John F. Manning, Constable 
^ Andover, October 24, 1990 

Essex, ss 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of the Constables 
of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at 
the time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true 
and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less 
then five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted. Said 
warrants have been posted at least 3even days. 

John F. Manning, Constable 



77 



74 



QUESTION 1 
PR0POSE0 AMENOMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 
Do you approve of the adoption o( an amendment to the consti- 
tution summarized below, which was approved by the General Court 
in joint sessions of the House ol Representatives and the Senate on 
December 17. 1987 by a vota*>/ 180to6. andonJune y, loqp^cy 
a vote of 186 to 6? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed constitutional amendment would repeal the constitutional pro- 
vision that a state census be taken and used as the basis for determining state 
representative, senatorial and councillor districts. The proposed constitutional 
amendment would provide that the federal census shall be the basis lor deter- 
mining such disuicls. 

QUESTION 2 
LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve ol a law summarized below, on which no vote was 
taken by the Senate or House of Representatives before May 2. 
1990? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed law would place restrictions on the State's use of consultants. 
It would place various limits on the amount of profit, overhead charges and 
expenses that the State could pay consultants. It would limit the duration ol 
consultant contracts to two years and any extension to one year, and it would 
limit the decree to which such con tracts couJd be changed to require payments 
in excess of the original contract. The proposed law would limit to $100,000 
the amount the State could pay on a consultant contract wjjh ao individual and 
would require al other consultant contracts in excess of $25,000 to be sought 
through competitive bidding. It would prohibit consultants from supervising 
State employees, and it would imit the use of consultants as substitutes lor 
State employee positions. 

In addition, the proposed law would place limits on the total amount ol money 
State agencies, departments and Authorities could spend on consultants each 
year. Subsidiary provisions would also establish a method for these entities 
to gradually come Into compliance with the new spending limits and would 
give authority to the State Secretary of Administration and Finance, on request, 
to permit some spending in excess of the new limits . The proposed law would 
also require State agencies, depart men is and Authorities as well as the Secre- 
tary of Administration and Finance to submit yearly reports concerning the 
State's consultant contracts to certain legislative committees and to the Inspec- 
tor General. 

Finally, the proposed law provides that any of its provisions. If found by a 
court to be unconstitutional or otherwise unlawful, would be severed Irom the 
law and the remaining provisions would continue in effect. 
QUESTION 3 
LAW PROPOSE0 BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was 
taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 2. 
1990? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would change the state income tax rate, allect language 
contained in certain tax provisions, and regulate the selling ol lees by slate 
agencies and authorities. 

The proposed law would set the state income tax rate on Pari B taxable 
income (in general, earned in.'im») at 4.25% for 1991 and 4.625% lor 1992. 
except for income Irom unemployment compensation, alimony. Massachusetts 
bank interest rental income, pension and annuity income, and IRA/Kcogn 
deductions, which would be taxed at 5%. 

The proposed law also provides that the fee imposed by any state agency 
or authority shall be no more than the fee that was in effect on or before June 
30, 1988. The state Secretary of Administration would determine the amount 
to be charged for any service, registration, regulation, license, fee, permit or 
other public lunction. except for the rates of tuition or fees at state colleges 
anduiwersitj««arry(cesorcJ»3rc^retatrvetotheadrnimstration3ndop<r^ 
aiion of the state courts. Any increase or decrease in a lee. or the estaWish- 
merit of any new lee. would require the approval of the i^erjislature. Any increase 
in a lee would not apply to persons 65 years of age or older. No state agency 
or authority could coBect arty fee which exceeds the adminrstrative costs direcuy 
incurred by the state agency or authority to produce and process the appnea- 
tjon lor any fcense or permit The Secretary of Administration must report inlor- 
mation concerning fees to the Legislature on an annual basis. 

The proposed law provides that for tax periods commencing onoraller Janu- 
aiy 1 .1991 . language in certain rxovisions of the Massachusetts general laws 
relating to taxes shall be the same as it was on August 2. 1989, or the effec- 
tive date of the proposed law, whichever language yields less tax revenue. The 
tax provisions alfected indude sections relating to (he surtax on business 
income r corporale excise taxes, S corporation taxes, taxes on security cor- 
porations, taxes on Part A income (In general, unearned income), bank taxes, 
excise taxes on alcoholic beverages and cigarettes, excise taxes on deeds, 
estate taxes, payments to the Commonwealth relating to horse and dog rac- 
ing, payments to the Commonwealth relating to boxing and sparring matches, 
taxes on utility companies, gasoline taxes, taxes on insurance companies, 
excise taxes on motor vehicles, taxes on urban redevelopment corporations, 
sales tax. use tax. room occupancy excise tax, property taxes, and taxes on 
proceeds from raffles and bazaars. 

The proposed law also contains a provision that if any sections of the law 
are held to be invalid, all other sections ol the law are to remain in elloct. 



STATE ELECTION 
NOVEMBER 6, 1990 
ADDENDUM - QUESTIONS 



J 



78 



^ 



L 



u 



L 



QUESTION 4 
LAW PR0P0SC0 BY INITIATIVE PETITION 
Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was 
taken by the Senate or House of Representatives before May 2. 
1990? - •• 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would change the state election laws governing the estab- 
lishment ol political parties and the nomination of candidates. 

The proposed law would allow voters to register under a political designa- 
tion other than ' 'Independent" and in addition to the two political parties previ- 
ously recognized by law (Republican or Democrat), if al least fifty voters request 
to be permitted to do so. It would allow any group to qualify as a political party 
under Massachusetts law If at least one percent of the total number of registered 
voters register to vote using that group's political designation, or If at least 
three percent of the votes cast at the preceding election for any statewide ol lice 
were cast for a candidate running under that group's political designation. 

The proposed law would set the minimum number of signatures needed on 
independent or minor party nomination papers for state office at one-half of 
one percent (1/2%) of the entire vote cast in the previous state election (or 
governor (as compared to 2% as of 1 989), and would also establish this num- 
ber of signatures as the upper limit needed for major parly candidates. The 
proposed law would also permit voters to sign the nomination papers of any 
number of candidates (or Uu same office, would require that all blank lor ms 
to be used for nomination papers and initiative and referendum petitions be 
no more man 8 1/2 " by 1 4 * in sue, and would allow signatures to be collected 
on exact copies of those forms. 

QUESTION 5 

1 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approvo of a law summarized below, on which no vole was 
taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 2. 
1990? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would regulate the disuibution to cities and towns of the 
Local Aid Fund, which consists of at least 40% of the revenue generated by 
the state income, sales, and corporate taxes, as well as the balance ol the State 
Lottery Fund. 

Subject to appropriation by the legislature, the State Treasurer would dis- 
tribute the Local Aid Fund to cities and towns on a quarterly basis, and each 
city or town would receive at least the same amount ol local aid it received 
in the previous fiscal year unless the total Local Aid Fund decreases. 

In tiscal year 1992. il there has been any increase over the fiscal year 1989 
fund, hall ol the increase would be distributed in accordance with the distri- 
bution (ormula used (or fiscal year 1989. and half would be distributed to eacli 
city and town in proportion to its population. 

In each yea/ after 1992, il (he (und increases, (he excess would be distributed 
throurjh a (ormula devised by the state Secretary o( Administration and Finance . 
with the advice and consent ol the Local Government Advisory Committee. 
II the fund decreases after 1992, each (own or city will have the amount it 
receives decreased by the same percentage. 

This proposed law also requires that the Treasurer publish an annual report 
about the Local Aid Fund, thai the stale Auditor publish an annual audit ol the 
Account, and (hat the Sccietary ol Administration and Finance issue to each 
cily and town an estimate ol funds it will receive Irom the Local Aid Fund 

Each city or town would be allowed to bring a lawsuit to force distribution 
ol the account, and would be entitled to a late payment (ce i( distribution is 
not timely. 

QUESTION 6 

THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 
Shall radio and television broadcast outlets be required to give 
free and equal time to all certified candidates for public office in t ive 
commonwealth? 



75 



STATE ELECTION 
NOVEHBER 6, 1990 
ADDENDUM - QUESTIONS 



79 



76 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 1990 



At a legal meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover qualified to 
vote in Elections at the designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, 
Tour, Five, Six, Seven and Eight in said Andover on the sixth day of November, 
1990 at 7:00 A.M. agreeable to the requirements of the foregoing warrant, th«y 
did bring in their votes as follows: 



PRECIHCT 



1H96 



TOTAL VOTE - 14.5S8 
2 3 4 5 



180U 



1808 



1894 



1913 



18S2 



1922 



1869 



J 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 



713 


877 


920 


698 


875 


842 


SS 


52 


46 



92S 812 862 9S7 

922 1022 9S3 920 

H7 49 37 45 



8 



845 John F. Kerry 
98S Jim Rappaport 
39 BLANKS 



6971 

7217 

370 



601 



G0VERN0R/LT. GOVERNOR 



676 



719 



761 



687 



737 



656 



663 Silber/Clapprood 



5500 

8tt3 1057 1027 1075 1186 1061 1208 1151 Weld/Cellucci 8608 

23 27 30 31 23 32 41 34 Uwiina/De Berry 241 

----- 1-- Paul Tsongas 1 

----- 3-- Dorothy Stevens 3 

----- 1-- John Meyer 1 

29 HH 32 27 17 17 17 21 BLANKS 204 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

871 1035 1085 1106 1030 1032 1068 1000 L. S. Harshbarger 8227 

558 690 648 714 821 751 777 814 William C. Sawyer 5773 

67 79 75 74 62 69 77 55 BLANKS 558 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



565 


671 


719 


689 


609 


636 


627 


644 


791 


737 


827 


957 


882 


892 


182 


215 


230 


264 


236 


221 


271 


10S 


127 


122 


114 


111 


113 


132 



601 Michael J. Connolly 5117 

921 Paul McCarthy 6651 j 

236 Barbara P. Ahearn 1855 

111 BLANKS 93S 



TREASURER 

421 480 480 459 450 408 394 381 William F. Galvin 3473 

944 1156 1152 1275 1312 1294 1355 1354 Joseph 0. Malone 9842 

61 88 78 74 78 79 100 75 C. David Nash 633 

70 80 98 86 73 71 73 59 BLANKS 610 



80 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 1990 



77 



AUDITOR 



705 


783 


788 


835 


569 


750 


711 


768 


104 


108 


133 


123 


118 


163 


176 


168 



744 713 782 

901 848 842 

121 128 141 

147 163 157 



8 



711 A. Joseph DeNucci 6061 

893 Douglas J. Murray 6282 

118 Steven K. Sherman 976 

147 BLANKS 1239 



^ 



693 


846 


853 


749 


888 


862 


1 


- 


- 


53 


70 


93 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

867 801 803 859 793 Cheater G. Atkins 6515 

956 1055 973 1004 1012 John F. MacGovem 7499 

----- Louise Hart 1 

71 57 76 59 64 BLANKS 543 











COUNCILLOR 


588 


609 


680 


635 


509 


560 


796 


1031 


937 


1093 


1257 


1129 


112 


164 


191 


166 


147 


163 



601 556 John F. Harkey 
1154 1160 John P. Harris 
167 153 BLANKS 



4738 
8557 
1263 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 



825 


936 


978 


967 


912 


931 


972 


870 


Patricia HcGovern 


7391 


597 


781 


751 


835 


937 


855 


877 


929 


Alba N. Castillo 


6562 


74 


87 


79 


92 


64 


66 


73 


70 


BLANKS 


605 



v w 



685 773 
785 980 
1 



25 



51 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

627 839 762 764 809 752 Susan C. Tucker 

921 1002 1112 1041 1069 1088 Gary M. Coon 

------ Neil Onerheim 



60 53 39 47 43 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



John Desmond, Jr. 
29 BLANKS 



911 1085 1092 1159 1068 1047 1062 1060 Kevin M. Burke 
585 719 716 735 845 805 860 809 BLANKS 



6211 

7998 

1 

1 

347 

8484 
6074 



v^ 



REGISTER OF PROBATE 



634 


738 


786 


813 


734 


685 


675 


605 


Peter M. Blanchette 


5670 


632 


821 


743 


825 


919 


898 


948 


1008 


Everett C. Hudson 


6794 


230 


245 


279 


256 


260 


269 


299 


256 


BLANKS 


2094 



81 



78 



1 

567 
692 
237 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 1990 

COUNTY TREASURER 
4 5 6 7 8 



630 670 678 598 606 640 564 Katherine O'Leary 4953 
893 827 941 1032 959 983 1039 George K. Mazareas 7366 
281 311 275 283 287 299 266 BLANKS 2239 



456 


518 


786 


982 


254 


304 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

542 553 443 468 486 440 Charles T. Arena 3906 

920 1026 1174 1086 1096 1143 Kevin J. Leach 8213 

346 315 296 298 340 286 BLANKS 2439 



QUESTION #1 

1183 1379 1425 1506 1613 1499 1574 1561 YES 11740 

222 299 279 312 253 275 285 235 NO 2160 

91 126 104 76 47 78 63 73 BLANKS 658 



*J 











QUESTION 


#2 






608 


765 


768 


858 


937 


896 


877 


837 


YES 


824 


962 


976 


988 


944 


901 


1001 


987 


NO 


64 


77 


64 


48 


32 


55 


44 


45 


BLANKS 










QUESTION 


#3 






639 


844 


806 


912 


999 


910 


907 


950 


YES 


826 


927 


971 


963 


898 


911 


994 


896 


NO 


31 


33 


31 


19 


16 


31 


21 


23 


BLANKS 



6546 

7583 

429 

6967 

7386 

205 



787 


885 


941 


564 


735 


711 


145 


184 


156 



736 


942 


634 


702 


126 


160 



QUESTION 04 
971 1065 955 1012 
789 749 751 778 
134 99 146 132 



973 YES 
761 NO 
135 BLANKS 



QUESTION #5 

920 1055 1113 1083 1033 1021 YES 

752 737 699 645 780 719 NO 

136 102 101 124 109 129 BLANKS 











QUESTION 


#6 








678 


806 


881 


899 


931 


902 




987 


892 


YES 


693 


802 


795 


888 


878 


821 




834 


873 


NO 


125 


196 


132 


107 


104 


129 




101 


104 


BLANKS 



7589 
5838 
1131 

7903 

5668 

987 

6976 

6584 

998 



J 



_y 



82 



^ 



v^ 



79 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, NOVEMBER 13, 1990 

Agreeably to a warrant 3igned by the Selectmen, October 22, 1990, the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Andover qualified to vote in Town Affairs were to 
have met and a33embled at the Collins Center on Shawsheen Road in said Andover 
on Tuesday, November 13, 1990 at 7:00 P.M. 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables 
of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of the said Town to meet 
at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said Warrant by posting a 
true and attested copy of the sane on the Town Hall, on each school house and 
in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

John F. Manning 
Constable 



The meeting was called to order by Moderator James D. Doherty at 7:20 P.M. 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 505 voters were admitted 
to the meeting. 

The opening prayer wa3 offered by Rev. Susan J. Morrison, Pa3tor, Ballard- 
vale United Church. 

Salute to the flag wa3 led by Selectman Jame3 M. Barenboim. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit thirteen non-voter3 to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Collins 
Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted that the Moderator refer 
to the articles by number and by subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1 - To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 4, The Budget, voted 
at the 1990 Annual Town Meeting held on June 11, 1990, by reducing 
the sum of $645,000 from the specific line item3 listed as follows: 

Line 4 - Municipal Maintenance, Other Expen3e3 $146,000 

Line 13 - School Department, Personal Services 205,648 

Line 14 - School Department, Other Expenses 93,352 

Line 19 - Insurance Expense 120,000 

Line 26 - Health Insurance Fund 80,000 

$645,000 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee wa3 read by Joanne Marden. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 1 
as presented in the Warrant by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 2 - To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum not to exceed 

$50,000.00 from amounts previously appropriated at the June 11, 
1990 Annual Town Meeting from the Municipal Maintenance "Other 
Expenses" account to the Municipal Maintenance "Personal Services" 
account. 

On petition of Ronald E. Hancock, Jr. and others. 

Article 2 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 3 - To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum not to exceed 

$80,000.00 from amounts previously appropriated at the June 11, 
1990 Annual Town Heeting from the Public Works "Other Expenses" 
account to the Public Works "Personal Services" account. 

On petition of Ronald E. Hancock, Jr. and others. 

Article 3 wa3 withdrawn. 



83 



80 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, NOVEMBER 13, 1990 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Alfred E. Daniels and duly seconded, 
it was VOTED to di330lve the Special Town Meeting at 8:15 P.M. 

ATTEST 



-A^uj^e^ ^v £f-i£*c<i*-r<-S 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



84 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



12-31-90 



STATE EQUAUZED VALUATION 

BORROWING CAPACITY 5% 

TOWN DEBT 12-31-90 

LESS DEBT OUTSIDE THE DEBT UMIT: 

1975-West Andover Sewer 
1976-Water 
1982-Schools 
1984-Water 
1986-Water 
1987-Water 

1988-Water Treatment Plant 
1989-Water Treatment Plant 
1989-Water Treatment Plant 
$14,511,250.00 

DEBT INSIDE THE DEBT UMIT: 

1976-Conservation Land 
1984-Parking Facility 
1984-Town Hall 
1986-Sewer 
1986-River Road 
1986-Land Acquisition 
1987-Sewers 
1988-School Computers 
1989-School Computers 
1989-Land Acquisition 
1989-Sewer 
1990-Sewer 
1990-Land Acquisition 
1990-School Computers 
1990-School Roof 

BORROWING CAPACITY 



$3,436,701,000.00 
171,835,050.00 



$23,395,000.00 



575,000.00 

225,000.00 
2,600,000.00 

700,000.00 
3,640,000.00 

160,000.00 
1,300,000.00 
4,336,250.00 

975.000.00 



200,000.00 
300,000.00 
305,000.00 
3,455,000.00 
720,000.00 
400,000.00 
200,000.00 
140,000.00 
281,250.00 
301,500.00 
306,000.00 
910,000.00 
820,000.00 
200,000.00 
350.000.00 



$ 8,883,750.00 
$ 162,954,300.00 



LEASES: 

1984-Town Hall 
1987-Library 
1985-Town Hall 
1990-Town Hall 
1990-Town Hall 
$ 9,980,850.00 



168,150.00 

600,000.00 

2.085,000.00 

2,600,000.00 

4.200.000.00 



TOWN DEBT 

Debt 

Leases 

Voted Not Bonded 



$ 23,395,000.00 
95,653,150.00 
12.666.837.00 

$ 45,714,987.00 



85 



TOWN OF ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1990 

GROUP I 

INCLUDED IN ASSESSOR" ESTIMATES 

1990 
ACTUAL REVENUE 

DISTRIBUTIONS AND REIMBURSEMENTS FROM STATE 5,099,058.69 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 2,1 1 1 ,723.76 

HOTEL\MOTEL TAX 553,556.00 

LICENSES 138.618.99 

FINES 418,998.00 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 45,056.97 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 1 22,488.59 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 435,658.41 

TOTAL HEALTH AND SANITATION 72,868.05 

SCHOOL 8.626.01 

RECREATION 265.780.39 

PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 3,728,687.54 

CEMETERIES 9,055.00 

LIBRARIES 203,895.00 

INTEREST 422,252.67 



13,636,324.07 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•a 

GROUP II 
OTHER ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

TAX TITLE REDEMPTIONS 40,279.21 

TAX TITLE COSTS 64.50 

RESTITUTION OF DAMAGES 100.00 

BID DEPOSITS 360.00 

RENTAL OF TOWN PROPERTY 9,444.00 

DEPARTMENTAL REIMBURSEMENTS 392,318.71 
REIMBURSEMENT GRANTS 

PROJECT 406-WS-041 3,424.113.89 

PROJECT WPC-1 -148 193.908.00 

IN LIEU OF TAXES 4.032.00 

SALE OF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT 210.00 

MISCELLANEOUS ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 31 .648.75 

PETTY CASH 1,550.00 

FEDERAL REIMBURSEMENT 59,252.00 



4,157,281.06 



86 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1990 

GROUP III 

AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS 

1990 
ACTUAL REVENUE 

PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 524,21 3.32 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 34,673,1 1 2.91 

TRUST FUND 973.125.31 

MATURITIES OF INVESTMENTS 40.542,1 67.87 

PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS 6,739,898.87 

TAILINGS 10,667.27 
FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING: 

ENTITLEMENTS 

INVESTMENT INCOME 9.68 9.68 

SEWER RATES 2.127,008.95 

SCHOOL LUNCH PROG RAM -ELDERLY 6,521 .41 

SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM-STATE 101,369.18 107,890.59 

SCHOOL AID 439.726.51 

TOWN GRANTS 450.277.57 

DOG LICENSES TO COUNTY 6.1 04.00 

SALE OF DOGS 42.00 

FISHING LICENSES TO STATE 9.71 8.50 

WETLAND FEES 4.187.50 

OFF STREET PARKING METERS 63.750.00 

SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 548.151.34 

ATHLETIC PROGRAM 48.555.18 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT USER FEES 6.034.10 

CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARES 1 9.738.00 

CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS 9.862.00 

CEMETERY FLOWER FU N DS 320. 00 

COUNCIL ON AGING REVOLVING 1 25.269.05 841 ,731 .67 

POLICE OFF DUTY DETAILS 667,1 86.72 

FIRE OFF DUTY DETAILS 7,676.70 
SALE OF TRASH BAGS 

GUARENTEE DEPOSITS 7,000.00 

MEALS TAXES 2,059.47 683,922.89 

INSURANCE CLAIM REFUNDS 4,255.77 

CH 71 SEC 71 E CUSTODIAL 24,804.75 

BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES 4,020,000.00 

TEMPORARY LOAN-FED AID 1 ,850,000.00 

BOND ISSUE PROCEEDS 5,625,000.00 

REVENUE ANTICIPATION LOANS 9,500,000.00 

ACCRUED INTEREST ON BOND PROCEEDS 8,080.57 

PREMIUM ON BONDING PROCEEDS 3,172.83 21,035,313.92 



109,149,067.33 
GRAND TOTAL 1 26.942.672.46 



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93 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET 

JUNE 30, 1990 





GENERAL 


CAPITAL 


SPECIAL 


LONG-TERM 


GRAND TOTAL 




FUND 


PROJECT 


REVENUE 


OBLIGATIONS 




ASSETS 












Cash and EquivelanU 


2,116,584.67 


1,397,047.37 


338,719.09 




3,852,351.13 


Accounts Recievables: 












Property Taxes 


2,355,630.50 




0.00 




2,355,630.50 


Excise Taxes 


295,308.41 




0.00 




295,308.41 


Water & Sewer Charges 


701,720.77 




0.00 




701,720.77 


Tax Liens 


878,204.62 




0.00 




878,204.62 


Departmental Revenue 


56,860.31 




0.00 




56,860.31 


Special Assessments 


236,781.40 




0.00 




236,781.40 


Due from other Govern 


614,095.99 
7,255,186.67 


0.00 


513,749.57 
852,468.66 




1,127,845.56 


Total Cash &. Recievables 


1,397,047.37 


0.00 


9,504,702.70 


Other Assets 












Tax Possessions 


67,408.27 




0.00 




67,408.27 


Amounts to be Provided for: 












Bond Anticipation Notes Payable 


0.00 


4,820,000.00 


250,000.00 




5,070,000.00 


Long Term Obligations 


0.00 




0.00 


32,283,150.00 
32,283,150.00 


32,283,150.00 


Total Assets 


7,322,594.94 


6,217,047.37 


1,102,468.66 


46,925,260.97 


LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 












Reserve for Abatements 


403,824.68 








403,824.68 


Deferred Revenue 


4,121,972.32 




513,749.57 




4,635,721.89 


Due to Other Governments 


(0.50) 




409.22 




408.72 


Unclaimed Items 


43,844.32 








43,844.32 


Excess on Sales of Low Value Land 


4,305.74 








4,305.74 


Guarentee Deposits 


15,348.95 








15,348.95 


Bond Anticipation Notes 


0.00 


4,820,000.00 


250,000.00 




5,070,000.00 


Bonds Payable-Inside Debt Limit 


0.00 






7,495,000.00 


7,495,000.00 


Bonds Pay able -Outside Debt Limit 


0.00 






14,445,000.00 


14,445,000.00 


Lease Obligations 


0.00 






10,343,150.00 


10,343,150.00 



Total Liabilities 



4,589,295.51 4,820,000.00 764,158.79 32,283,150.00 42,456,604.30 



Fund Balances 
Unreserved 
Reserved for: 

Continued Appropriations 

Encumbrances 

Reserve for Special Purposes 
Designated for: 

Over/Under Assessments 

Unprovided for Abates & Exempts 

Total Fund Balances 

Total Liab. &. Fund Balance 



678,900.97 

541,862.41 1,338,393.87 
989,723.01 58,653.50 

670,000.00 

14,430.00 
(161,616.96) 



334,125.82 



4,184.05 



2,733,299.43 1,397,047.37 338,309.87 



1,013,026.79 

1,880,256.28 

1,052,560.56 

670,000.00 

14,430.00 
(161,616.96) 



0.00 4,468,656.67 



7,322,594.94 6,217,047.37 1,102,468.66 32,283,150.00 46,925,260.97 



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99 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1989 



Employees' Payroll Deductions 

State Grants 

State and County Assessments 

Refunds: 

Real Estate Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Taxes 

Water Rates and Services 

Sewer Charges 

Interest and Demands 

Miscellaneous 
Petty Cash 

Off-duty Work Details 
Miscellaneous Trust Funds 
Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 
Unemployment Compensation 
Insurance Fund 
Fishing Licenses to State 
Wetland Fees to State 
Walter Raymond Fund 
James Greely Trust Fund 
Lucy Shaw Fund 
Police Department Drug Abuse 
Investment Funds 
Temporary Borrowing 
School Lunch Program: 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 
Student Teachers 
Andover Athletic Program 
Community ASK 
Music Revolving 
Telethon Revolving 
Collaborative Revolving 
Metropolitan Life Revolving 
Physical Education Revolving 
Chapter 71 Sec 71 E 
Council on Aging 
Tailings 
Meals Taxes 
Court Judgements 
Fireworks - Gift 
SHED Contributions 
Damage Restitution 
Tot Lot 

Tax Title Expenses 
River Road 
Chapter 90 Funds 
Community Garden Project 
Frontage Road 
Bond Deposit 
Old Town Hall Restoration 
Guarantee Deposits 



6.884,796.72 
592,967.03 
606,333.42 



549,696.68 

1.186.47 

41,133.61 

7,599.23 

2,307.44 

243.67 

14,000.30 



9,719.00 
4,187.50 
80.00 
2,500.67 
887.74 
3,158.50 



355,575.67 
302,538.48 



616,167.40 

1,550.00 

673,491.45 

141,872.30 

739.419.75 

32.490.00 

51.038.60 

21.934.49 



20,533.41 
40,634,872.45 
21.625.000.00 



658.114.15 
1,043.83 

23,372.92 
3,594.95 
6,010.99 
1,583.24 
2,221.00 
61.80 
1,709.78 

25,182.60 

34,321.86 

7,979.30 

1,927.88 

167.552.18 

1.070.98 

43,316.54 

27,883.80 

12,684.48 

5.029.80 

529.797.46 

2.912.51 

340.33 

50.00 

15,217.21 

35,447.13 

74,250.893.74 



100 



TOWN OF ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

AUGUST 30, 1990* 

ARTICLE PROJECT NAME AUTHORIZATION 

ART 43, 1 982 RIVERINA ROAD 1 ,000,000.00 

ART 21 , 1 984 RIVERINA ROAD PLANT EXPANSION 866,837.00 

ART 1 A, 1 987 WATER TREATMENT PLANT EXPANSION 6,950,000.00 

ART 1 8, 1 985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 1 ,1 60,000.00 

ART 1 8, 1 987 SCHOOL COMPUTERS 1 00,000.00 

ART 37, 1 987 WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 1 ,300,000.00 

ART 20, 1 989 SHED TEMPORARY CLASSROOMS 1 50,000.00 

ART 25, 1989 ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL ROOF 150,000.00 

ART 28, 1 989 SEWER-LOWELL ST/WEST PARISH DR 90,000.00 

ART 31, 1989 ENGINEERING SPECS 500,000.00 

ART 32, 1989 STORM DRAINS 100,000.00 

ART 33, 1989 SEWER-NORTH STREET 190,000.00 

ART 46, 1 990 TRAFFIC SIGNAL FRONTAGE7DASCOMB 1 1 0,000.00 



12,666,837.00 



•THIS SCHEDULE REFLECTS $3,255,000 OF BORROWING 
AUGUST 01, 1990 



101 




DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1990 

ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James M. Barenboim, Ch. - 1991 

William T. Downs. V. Ch. - 1993 

Gail L Ralston, Sec. - 1991 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr. - 1992 

Gerald H. Silverman • 1992 



ANDQVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Mary Jane Powell, Ch. - 1993 
Ronald C. Hajj, V Ch. - 1991 

Eleen M. Connolly, Treas. - 1994 
John P. Hess - 1995 

FrancisA. McNulty* - 1991 

'Appointed by Commissioner 
of Dept. of Comm. Affairs. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Michael A. Frishman, Ch. - 1991 

Susan T. Poore - 1991 

Christopher M. Outwin - 1993 

Andres C. Salazar - 1992 

Richard L Hubbell - 1992 
Edwin F. Reidel 

REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMfTTEE 

Gerald Grasso, Andover 
Terrence L Breen, Methuen 
Thomas L Groedine, Methuen 
Leo L LaMontagne, Lawrence 
Francis J. McLaughlin, Lawrence 
Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 
John J. Caffrey, No. Andover 



TOWN MODERATOR 
James D. Doherty - 1991 

TRUSTEES. CORNELL FUND 
Alcide J. Legendre 
John J. Williams 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD 
FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger - 1991 
Joan M. Lewis 
John R. Petty 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Reverend James A. Diamond 
Reverend Graham L.N. Ward 



APPOINTIVE 

TOWN MANAGER - Reginald S. Stapczynski 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - Kenneth R. Seifert 



FINANCE 

Joanne F. Marden. Ch. 
Donald W. Robb 
Frederic A. Stott 
Peter J. Volpe 
John J. Dwyer 
Frederick P. Fitzgerald 
Edward A. Wail 
Virginia S. Keaton 
Donald F. Schroeder 

PLANNING BOARD 
Carl J. Byers 
Susan G. Stott 
John D. O'Brien 
William J. Dalton 
Hooks K. Johnston. Jr. 

TRUSTEES. MEMORIAL HALL UBRARY 

Patricia H. Edmonds 
Maria A. Rizzo 
Joseph A. Glasser 
Karen M. Herman 
Margaret I. Jurgen 
Thomas J. Swift 
Melissa Morris Danisch 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Wesley E. Whitney, Ch. 
Pamela H. Mitchell 
C. Ryan Buckley 
Wallace L Bolton 
Carol C. McDonough 

Associate Members: 

Jane E. Griswold 

Peter F. Reilly 

Daniel S. Casper 

Paul Bevacqua 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

John R. Williams 
Alice M. Hart 
Robert R. Schmidt 
Wendell A. Mattheson 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert A. Pustell 
Donald D. Cooper 
Phillip F. Wormwood 
Scott Matsumoto 
Mark S. Curtin 
Judith M. Chupasko 
James M. Marsh 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
William J. Krajeski 
Archibald D. MacLaren 
Anthony J. Torrisi 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 
Dr. Stephen H. Loring 
John R. Kruse 



TOWLEFUND 

Phillip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Wescott 
Marilyn R. Brody 

G.L SANrTARY DISTRICT 

Robert E. McQuade 



DESIGN ADVISORY COMM. 
Susan B. Dennett 
Nancy B. McBride 
Thomas P. McClearn 
Christopher S. Doherty 
Donald J. Harding 



102 



INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANCING AIJTH. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 

Michael W. Morris 

Thomas J. Swift 

Paul W. Cronin 

Robert A. Finlayson 

DEVELOPMENT & INDUS. COMM. 
Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
S. Joseph Hoffman 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John S. Sullivan 
Bernice M. Haggerty 
Thomas J. O'Leary 
Karen M. Herman 
Margaret C. Roberts 
Philip K. Allen - Ch. Emeritus 



COMMITTEE ON TOWN TRUST FUNDS 
Andrew A. Shea 
Myron H. Muise 
Robert A. Henderson 

TRUSTEES OF SPRING 
GROVE CEMETERY 
Gilbert J. Cromie 
Charles A. Bergeron 
Paul W. Cronin 
Rebecca A. Backman 
Irving J. Whitcomb 
Lawrence J. Hesinius, Jr. 

MERRIMACK VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 
Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 



RETIREMENT BOARD 

William T. Downs 
Leo F. Daly 
Rodney P. Smith 

ANDOVER ARTS COUNCIL 

Norma A. Gammon 
Mary G. Bailey 
Annetta R. Freedman 
Margaret A. Pustell 
John F. Zpeto 
Katherine Hoffman 
Diane Pitochelli 
Teresa Morgan 
Ruth N. Ruskin 
Ron Wackowski 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMOTEE 

John R. Dempsey 
Annetta R. Freedman 
Susan K. O'Neill 
James P. Murphy 
James M. Lyman 

PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY/ 

STREET OF FLAGS COMMITTEE 

John J. Lewis 
Richard J. Bo wen 
John C. Doherty 
Harold F. Hayes 
John Milne 
Edward J. Morrissey 
James M. Bamford 
Robert M. Henderson 
William C. MacKenzie 



COUNCIL ON AGING 
Thomas F. Powers 
Helen A. Watkinson 
Agnes Gallagher 
Dorothy L Bresnahan 
William L Lane 
Oscar Rosenberg 
Doreen Correnti 
Paul L Twomey 
Robert P. Kenney 
Larry L Larsen 
Irving Gershenberg 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 
COMMfTTEE 

Kenneth De Ben edict is 
Nancy B. Brother 
John J. Barry 
Robert P. Kenney 
Dr. Robert Katz 
Arthur W. Iworsley 
Rosalie Bialy 

SHED BOARD OF 
DIRECTORS 

Paul Finger 
Lois Karfunkel 
Molly Marsh 
Judy Rogers 
Kim Yoshida 

ANDOVER HOUSING PARTNERSHIP/ 

FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 

Carl J. Byers 

David Hastings 

Christopher D. Haynes 

Lorene A. Comeau 

Thomas J. O'Leary, Jr. 

Jean L Salazar 

Virginia F. Cascino 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 

Edward M. Kennedy, 1702 P.O. Bldg., Boston 
John Kern/, 2003 JFK Federal Bldg., Boston 

SECOND ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

Patricia McGovern - 74 Saunders St., Lawrence 

SEVENTEENTH ESSEX DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Gary M. Coon, 27 Korinthian Way, Andover 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

Chester Atkins, 134 Middle St., Lowell 

FIFTH COUNCILOR DISTRICT 

John P. Harris, 31 Lincoln Circle, Andover 



103 



DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT HEADS AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1990 



Animal Inspector Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

Civil Defense Director James F. Johnson 

Community Development Department 

Director of Health Everett F. Penney 

Inspector of Buildings '. Sam J. DeSalvo 

Director of Planning Steven L Colyer 

Electrical Inspector Richard J. Salenas 

Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector Bruce P. Hale 

Council On Aging Mary A. Byrne 

Finance and Budget Director Anthony J. Torrisi 

Chief Assessor William J. Krajeski 

Collector/Treasurer Myron H. Muise 

Data Processing Manager Barbara A. Botsch 

Purchasing Agent John W. Aulson 

Veterans Service Agent John J. Lewis 

Fire Chief Harold F. Hayes 

Game Warden Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden James W. Deyermond 

Deputy Game Warden Eugene A. Zalla 

Housing Authority Executive Director Nancy M. Marcoux 

Municipal Maintenance Director Frederick L Jaeschke 

Building Superintendent Kenneth H. Parker 

Forester (Cemetery, Forestry, Parks) James M. Bamford 

PHE/Vehicle Maint. Superintendent James J. Brightney 

Police Chief James F. Johnson 

Dog Officer Wayne D. Nadar 

Public Works Director Robert E. McQuade 

Highway Superintendent John F. Canavan, Jr. 

Town Engineer John Avery, Jr. 

Memorial Hall Library Director Nancy C. Jacobson 

Town Accountant Rodney P. Smith 

Town Clerk Randall L Hanson 

Town Counsel Alfred L Daniels 



104 



INDEX 



Animal Control 20 

Animal Inspection 20 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Civil Defense 19 

Community Dev. & Planning 33 

Building Inspection 33 

Conservation 38 

Electrical Inspection 34 

Health 35 

Planning Board 33 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection 34 

Zoning Board 34 

Community Services 21 

Council on Aging 21 

Directory of Town Officials 1 02 

Directory of Department Heads 104 

Finance & Budget 7 

Assessors 11 

Central Purchasing 10 

Collector/Treasurer 12 

Veterans Services 10 

Financial Statements 85 

Fire Department 17 

Game Warden 20 

Greater Lawrence Tech. School 22 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 32 

Historical Commission 27 

Housing Authority 39 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 15 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 15 

Memorial Hall Library 40 

Municipal Maintenance 28 

Building 28 

Forestry 29 

Parks 29 

Plumbing, Heating & Electrical 30 

Spring Grove Cemetery 13 

Vehicle Maintenance 30 

Police Department 19 

Public Works Department 30 

Engineering 30 

Highway 31 

Sewer 32 

Water 32 

Recycling 16 

Town Clerk 6 

Town Counsel 15 

Town Manager 1 

Town Meeting Minutes 41 

Trustees Punchard Free School 24 



105 



NOTES